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    Running Off-Road: These 5 Trail Running Tips Will Get You Started

    If you think trail running only happens in the mountains, you’re mistaken.Running off-road is about leaving the streets and running on a natural surface. We’ll give you 5 tips to make it easier to ditch tar for off-road running. 1. Look for the right trail running routeYou don’t necessarily have to go into the wild for your next trail run. Look for a route that takes you through parks, on gravel paths, or across fields. You’ll find new areas away from where you usually run and get an introduction to running off-road. If you’re not that familiar with your surroundings, take a look at the map and get an idea of where you might find some trails. Expert Tip:Be free and run without a plan. Decide where you want to go according to how you feel; be spontaneous and try different running surfaces. Trail running is not necessarily about setting a PR; it’s also about experiencing your environment. 2. Train for new conditions The biggest challenge you have in trail running is the different terrain you run on. It’s a good idea to develop your leg muscles if you want to run trails. Exercises to improve stability and balance help prevent injuries. You should also strengthen your ankles so you don’t end up twisting or spraining them.  Where does trail running happen? In trail running, only 20% of the route should be on paved surfaces like asphalt and cobblestones. The rest is run on rougher terrain. The different parts of the route can be on gravel paths, trails in the woods, and single-track trails. Are you ready for a bit of competition? Lace up your trail running shoes and compete against Gaia, a wild mountain lion, in this year’s Run Wild challenge!3. Prepare for off-road running with bodyweight exercisesWhen you’re ready to prepare for your first trail run, try the following bodyweight exercises:Stability and balance exercises: Plank: This full-body workout is a great way to strengthen your core. Single-Leg Stand: Stand on one leg and slowly come up onto your toes. As soon as you feel confident enough, you can try this exercise on an uneven surface.Single-Leg Deadlift: Stand on one leg and bend forward at the hips. Lift your other leg and stretch it out behind you until it’s at a 90° angle to the leg you are standing on.  Exercises to increase jump strength:Jump Lunges: Switch sides as you jump into these lunges. Single-Leg Jump: Stand on one leg and jump up and down or move forward as you jump. Speed Skater: Jump sideways from one leg to the other quickly like a speed skater. Box Jumps: Jump up onto a raised surface with both legs. (Want to become a box jump pro? Check out our box jump blog post.)4. Start slowly Since trail running usually involves a lot of uneven surfaces, your legs will get stronger than running on the road. Your body has to burn more energy to deal with the constant changes in conditions and surfaces. Take it easy on your first trail runs and keep it slow, so you aren’t gasping for breath right away. Over time you can start playing with different speeds on a variety of terrain (like fartlek). 5. Choose the right trail running shoesThe running shoes you wear for the road are fine for flat surfaces. But as soon as you start running steeper trails, you should think about getting shoes with good grip. Remember:Don’t tie your shoes too tight but snug enough so that you don’t slide around in them. Tuck the big loops of your laces into the lacing, so they don’t catch on branches. There is a variety of trail running gear available to make your experience more enjoyable. You can store drinks or energy bars in special running packs, in case you are out for a longer run. Caution — eyes on the ground! Unlike when you run on the road, trails are full of hazards: roots, loose stones, or the wet, slippery forest floor make it essential to watch where you’re going when you run.Would you like to learn more about trail running? We have the Top 3 Beginner Tips from the Pros for you.*** More

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    Get Healthy by Walking for Weight Loss

    Walking for weight loss is one of the best ways to start losing weight. Walking isn’t just good for weight loss; it has incredible mental health benefits as well.If you haven’t tried walking for weight loss before, give it a try this year and realize all the fantastic benefits walking for weight loss has to offer!Benefits of Walking for Weight LossEveryone can walk for weight loss! It’s a great way to lose weight and keep it off because it’s not a fad diet or an unsustainable exercise plan. In terms of equipment, you only need a comfortable pair of running or walking shoes and clothes.Physical benefitsWalking is a low-impact activity. That makes it a safe activity for people that struggle to run, get injured easily, or are overweight. Walking mostly burns fat when performed for durations longer than 30-minutes. Walking for weight loss can even improve your cholesterol levels!Check out this calorie burn calculator to see how many calories you burn in an activity.Mental health benefitsWalking for weight loss has proven mental health benefits[1]. Had a stressful day at work? Go for a 30-minute walk and feel the stress melt away. Kids and partner on your nerves? Go for a walk and reset your mind while taking care of your body. Put on a podcast, listen to music, listen to an audiobook and take the mental health benefits even further!How to Walk for Weight LossWalking for weight loss is easier than you think. You could start by estimating how much you currently walk or do other physical activities and then aim to add a half-hour more per day most days of the week. Here are some considerations if you’re considering running if you’re overweight.Where to Walk for Weight LossWalking in parks and other green spaces has tremendous mental health benefits[2]. People who walk in green spaces report having more self-esteem and better overall mood. People also report “feelings of anger, depression, tension and confusion all significantly reduced and vigor increased[3].” Try to walk in green spaces like parks, hiking trails, mountains and beaches for an extra mental health boost.Even walking in a shopping center has proven to have benefits for older people[4]!Still have questions about walking for weight loss? Check the frequently asked questions below:Walking for Weight Loss: FAQ1. Can You Lose Weight by Walking for Weight Loss?Yes, walking for weight loss works! Walking for extended periods at a conversational pace will mostly burn fat. The key to walking for weight loss is to increase how many calories you burn and how many calories you consume per day. For example, you could maintain your current diet and simply add 30 minutes more walking per day than you are currently doing. You would eventually lose weight this way. However, if you are trying to lose weight, you probably also need to look at your current diet. Chances are you are consuming too many calories, which has led to the need to lose weight. The good news is that by trimming some calories and walking for weight loss, you will increase the rate at which you lose weight! You burn more calories from walking, and you consume fewer calories overall. Get the facts on healthy weight loss.It’s hard, and it might be uncomfortable for a little while, but stick with it and believe that you will do it!Check out our best diet and weight loss tips!2. How Many Steps a Day to Lose Weight Walking for Weight Loss?The short answer is more than you are currently doing. 10,000 steps are roughly equal to 2,000 – 3,500 calories (about a quarter kilogram to half a kilogram of body weight). If you add an extra 10,000 steps per day (about a half-hour of walking), then you will likely lose about a quarter kilogram of body weight per week just by walking a little bit more each day.If you’re new to fitness, 10,000 steps (half-hour) may seem like too much. That’s okay. Start with just 1,000 steps more each day. Add more steps each day as you get fitter and your body can handle it. Go slow and be patient: being overweight doesn’t happen in a day, and it won’t be fixed in a day. 3. How Much Walking for Weight Loss?The short answer is more walking than you are currently doing. Try for at least 30-minutes of walking for weight loss per day. If you can’t start there, start with just 10 minutes and work your way up. There is no upper limit other than what your schedule allows and what your body can safely handle. If your schedule gets in the way of walking for weight loss, break up your walks. Instead of going for an hour-long walk, try 2 30-minute walks. Sneak in walks by parking further away, walking to places you might otherwise drive, or walking with friends, family or pets.Don’t sweat the details—just start walking!4. Does Walking for Weight Loss Burn Fat?Yes, walking for weight loss burns fat. It also burns the other two macronutrients, carbohydrates and protein. The first few minutes of walking will burn primarily carbohydrates. However, your body will prioritize burning fat after around 30 minutes. 5. Running Vs. Walking: What Burns More Calories?It’s a little complicated, but running burns more calories than walking. However, you can walk longer than you can run, leading to more total calories burned. If running hurts your joints, try walking for weight loss. Walking for weight loss is also a great way to build up your body to try eventually running.6. Is Walking for Weight Loss the Quickest Way to Lose Weight?No. But it is one of the more sustainable and achievable ways to lose weight. If you’re serious about losing weight and being healthy it’s going to take time and commitment. Shortcut the shortcuts and commit to getting healthy this year by walking for weight loss.*** More

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    How Can a Running Warm-Up Help Optimize Performance?

    It’s no secret that a running warm-up[1] is important if it’s a race or the usual weekly run. But many runners don’t know why (or what to watch out for).We’ve compiled a short list of the benefits of running warm-ups, tips on how to warm up properly and go-to running warm-up routines.Find out below how running warm-ups improve your running performance. Check out the go-to warm-up routines at the bottom of the article!1. Running warm-ups raise your body temperatureDynamic warm-up exercises raise your body temperature by heating up your muscles. They also boost your metabolism and accelerate the supply of energy to your muscles.2. Running warm-ups enhance muscle performance [2] As your muscle temperature rises, your muscle viscosity (or resistance) decreases. This results in faster muscle contraction and relaxation, which enhances your performance.3. Running warm-ups boost heart functionYour heart also benefits from warming up. The exercises increase your cardiac output and respiratory minute volume (RMV), thus expanding your VO2 max.4. Running warm-ups improve the load distribution in your jointsContrary to previous belief, new research has shown that even short-term exercise like warming up can help build joint cartilage. The thicker layer of cartilage increases the load-bearing surface and distributes loads more evenly.5. Running warm-ups help prevent injuriesWarming up properly has been proven to minimize the risk of injury. It increases tissue and muscle flexibility and prepares your body to perform fast and explosive movements. Plus, you are less likely to pull or tear a muscle.As an added advantage, warming up improves your mental focus and speeds up your reaction time.Useful Running warm-up tips:Focus on those muscles that will do most of the work.The warm-up effect is short-lived, so keep warming up until the beginning of your race/run. Research has shown that your body temperature remains elevated for only about 10 minutes after you warm up and that after 45 minutes, all traces of your warm-up are gone.It may seem counterintuitive, but if you are warming up for a race, the shorter the race is, the longer your warm-up should be.Never start off with sprints or explosive movements. You should gradually increase the intensity of your warm-up. Your warm-up should never cross your anaerobic threshold.In addition, there are several factors to consider when deciding on how long and how hard to warm up: the distance of the race/run, the time of day, the weather, your age and your physical fitness. Most warm-up routines last somewhere between 10 and 45 minutes (for a race). Unfortunately, there is no one-plan-fits-all approach to warming up. Try the suggested running warm-up routines below and see if they work for you:[embedded content]*** More

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    Get in Shape with these Wheelchair Exercise Tips and Workout

    These wheelchair exercises and full workout will help you begin your fitness journey or continue on it if you’re an athlete with an impairment that requires you to use a wheelchair. Maybe you are even thinking of trying a wheelchair racing event or other wheelchair sports. Whatever your goals, this wheelchair exercise workout will get your going and challenge you! First, learn why wheelchair exercise is like any other exercise program.Wheelchair Exercise Isn’t Fundamentally DifferentThe basics of fitness do not change just because an athlete happens to use a wheelchair. All athletes need to build a solid aerobic engine. All athletes need to develop functional strength. We are all athletes, and we build fitness in unique ways—wheelchairs don’t change this.Our bodies do not care if you use a wheelchair, a prosthesis, have a visual impairment, etc. As far as fitness is concerned: energy goes in, and energy comes out. All athletes must constantly monitor their body to see how it is reacting to workouts. Athletes need to ensure they don’t overwork muscles or overtrain. Check with your doctor before beginning any new exercise program.With that in mind, try this wheelchair exercise workout!Wheelchair Exercise WorkoutWarm-up Start every workout by warming up soft tissue and mobilizing the joints and muscles to be worked. The goal of the warmup is to raise your body’s temperature so ork up a light sweat. Get in the right mental space by doing mental exercises (disregard the title of the linked blog post—these exercises are for all athletes).Warm-up Wheelchair ExercisesTriceps stretch (stretches your triceps, upper back and shoulders): Keep back straight and your arms at your sides.Lift one arm up overhead, and then bend your elbow and reach your hand down your back as far as you can. Use your opposite hand to give gentle assistance until you feel a stretch. Exhale and hold for 2-seconds.Relax and return to the starting position.Complete the set on one side before repeating with the opposite arm.Trunk Rotation (stretches your trunk and hips):Sit on the ground with legs straight.Cross right leg over left, bending the knee and placing the right foot on the ground to the outside of the right knee.Twist trunk to right placing the left elbow on the outside of the left knee.Exhale and hold for 2-seconds, relax and repeat six times.Trigger Point – Chest (releases tension in your chest):Press a trigger ball (tennis ball, for example) against your pec just above your armpit with your opposite hand.Adjust your position until you find a sore point.Holding pressure on this spot, slide your free hand overhead and back down.Re-adjust your position and repeat the movement on any other sore spots you find.Complete the set on one side before repeating on the other side.Ys – (works your shoulders and upper back):Raise your arms overhead to form a Y. Keep your torso tight and thumbs back.Glide your shoulder blades towards your spine and pull arms slightly back.Return to the starting position.Repeat six times.Ts – (stretches your chest):Raise your arms overhead to form a T. Keep your torso tight and thumbs back.Glide your shoulder blades towards your spine and pull your arms slightly back.Return to the starting position.Repeat six times.Ws – (works your shoulders and upper back):Raise your arms overhead to form a W. Keep your torso tight and thumbs back.Glide your shoulder blades towards your spine and pull arms slightly back.Return to the starting position.Repeat six times.This comprehensive warm-up will help prevent muscle spasms and cramps.Compound Movements Wheelchair ExercisesBalance the workload across the body by breaking the workout into the two primary muscle groups to be worked: core and upper body. To further spread the load across each muscle group, focus on the arms’ arms’ direction during the exercise.Compound Movement ExercisesOverhead Press – Dumbbell (Works your shoulders):Back straight, chest up, holding a pair of dumbbells at your shoulders with your palms facing forward.Press the weights overhead while keeping still.Lower the weights to your shoulders.Do two sets of eight reps (2×8).Row – Cable (Works your upper back, shoulders and torso):Attach two handles to the cables. Sit facing the machine, just farther than arm’s length away.Keeping your torso stable, pull the handles to your body by driving your elbow back and close to your torso.Return to the starting position.Continue for the full set.Complete two sets of eigh reps (2×8).Core Movements Having a strong core makes everything in life more manageable. For athletes that use wheelchairs, a strong core means more rotational stability and a strong base for propulsion.Focus on rotational, diagonal pattern movements. Do moves that go from high to low. Then do moves that start low and go high. Core Movement Wheelchair ExerciseRotational Lift – Low to High (works your shoulders, triceps and torso):Attach a rope handle to a low cable pulley. Holding the rope with both hands, sit with your side to the cable machine.Rotate your shoulders and arms toward the machine.In one continuous motion, pull the handles toward your chest, rotate your shoulders away from the machine and push the rope up and away.Reverse the movement back to the starting position.Complete the set on one side before repeating on the other side.Complete two sets of eight reps (2×8).Isolated Movements Wheelchair ExercisesIsolated movements build strong and defined muscles. Due to the focus on one muscle, few reps and sets can be completed before the muscle tires. To work specific muscles, begin with bicep curls, lateral raises and triceps extensions.Isolated Movement Wheelchair ExercisesBicep Curls – Alternating Dumbbells (works your biceps):Sit holding dumbbells in each hand at your side.Keeping your elbows at your sides, curl one dumbbell up to your shoulder.Lower the weight back down to the starting position. Repeat with the other arm.Continue alternating for the full set.Complete two sets of eight reps (2×8).Tricep extension – Dumbbell (works your shoulders):Hold the dumbbell slighly behind your head with your elbows bent.Extend both elbows to push the dumbbell overhead.Bend your elbows to return to the starting position.Continue for the remainder of the set.Complete two sets of eight reps (2×8).CardioThe goal of cardio work is to elevate your heart rate for an extended period of time.You could do this by doing a resistance movement at a low resistance for several minutes. One amazing cardio exercise for athletes that use wheelchairs is to head out for an extended time on your wheelchair. The movement is inherently aerobic! You could also try using a hand ergometer or swimming.If using a resistance machine for cardio, set it to low resistance. Perform the movement for 10 minutes to start and work your way up to 20 minutes.Cool-DownA massage is great for cool-down. Focus on areas that feel like you really worked them. A massage tool is sufficient but a professional massage can do wonders for your recovery.Perform the same exercises as in your warm-up to stretch out worked muscles and get your body’s recovery process kickstarted.Include these muscle-boosting foods in your post-workout meals to recover quicker and build muscle.Help us produce better content for you. What fitness and health topics specific for athletes with impairments would you like to learn? Leave a comment:*** More

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    4 Tips for Running on Vacation • How to Stay Fit and Have fun

    ​​Summer is in full swing and your vacation is just around the corner. For many people, running is an active way to relax and recharge: therefore, many runners can’t imagine not running while on holiday. That being said, here are 4 tips for running on vacation so you can stay fit and enjoy your time off: 1. Mix up your routine with cross-trainingRunners who have a race scheduled after their vacation might want to use the time to take their training up a notch. However, you shouldn’t forget that your break is supposed to provide you with some much-needed recovery time from your normal busy life. Be careful that your running doesn’t add additional stress. You should decide before you leave if you want to do a training camp or focus on rest and relaxation.Of course, it’s a good idea to use running as an active way to relax and relieve daily stress. But on vacation, just try not to focus on distance, pace, and intensity. Take a short break from your training plan and do some cross-training like swimming or cycling. Try some bodyweight training workouts for runners when you wake up in the morning. The change can actually help improve your performance in the long run.Sometimes, less is more:Vacation means rest. Don’t force yourself to work out if your body needs a break.2. Don’t forget about your travel companionsIf you want to run on vacation, you need to balance this with the needs of your significant other, family or friends. There is nothing more annoying for your fellow travelers than constantly having to organize their day around your training plan.Timing: The best times to go running are early in the morning or late in the evening. Plus, it is a good idea to let your loved ones participate in your running experience: have your significant other, children or friends run along with you – together we are stronger!3. Embrace the new opportunitiesRunning on vacation shouldn’t be goal-oriented. Your mind would also benefit from some variety from your usual running routine. Aim to discover new things: marvel at the scenery, discover new routes, and use the time to explore your surroundings. Why not try trail running for a change? This knowledge of the area can come in handy later on day trips and you get to see places off the normal tourist track.Tip:Before setting out, make sure your GPS is functioning and that you have a map of the area downloaded to your phone. That way you don’t have to worry about finding your way back.4. Get used to the new conditionsPay attention to the new conditions of your vacation location and don’t underestimate the effort needed to adjust: differences in climate, time zone, or running surface (sand or rock) can have a big impact on your body. Also, the intensity of the sun should not be underestimated during the summer months. A light wind or a cool breeze might make it difficult to tell the temperature or how much UV radiation your body is being exposed to. Plus, many runners are not accustomed to the extra effort of running in mountain air.Make sure to drink plenty of water throughout the day to avoid dehydration. You should also give your body ample opportunities to recover from the extra stress of the new conditions. Remember, staying fit on vacation is not only about exercise. Rest and relaxation is a big part of staying healthy; a holistic approach will give you better results in the long run.TakeawayThere are lots of benefits to running on vacation: you add to your holiday experience and can work off some of the stress of your normal busy life. Vacation is a perfect time to recharge your batteries and a great opportunity to try a digital detox.These tips for running on vacation should help keep you on track with your fitness, but more importantly – help you prioritize during this well-earned break. Try to free your mind of any thoughts about races and training plans.*** More

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    7 Couples’ Workout Tips to Get Fit with a Partner or Workout Buddy

    Couples’ workouts are a great way to spend time with someone while getting fit. They can also ruin relationships if poorly executed. Couples’ workouts can be particularly challenging if one partner is much fitter than the other. This post will help you make the most of couples’ workouts so that everyone can get in a challenging and fun activity together. Good to know:These tips are also suitable for workout buddies and fitness partners—not just couples!Benefits of Couples’ Workouts, Workout Buddies and Fitness PartnersWorking out with someone else has many benefits:Everyone is more likely to stay accountable to their fitness goals[1].A workout partner who is fitter than you can help you push yourself.Couples’ workouts can boost a couple’s sex life.Working out with a partner can deepen the relationship.Your partner can help you improve your technique.However, couples’ workouts can be tricky to navigate. A fitter partner may feel like their less fit partner will hold them back. They could feel like they’re letting their partner or gym buddy down. The less fit partner may become demoralized.These seven strategies will help you make the most of your couples’ workouts, whether they’re with a special someone, a workout buddy or a fitness partner! Tip 1: Be HonestAcknowledge the difference in fitness. Be respectful and don’t put each other down. Don’t downplay the fitness differential. Instead, call it out respectfully and tie it to the purpose of the workout (more on that below).It can be tempting for the fitter partner to pretend that they aren’t fitter. This is a swift way to annoy your less fit workout partner because you are basically lying to them. They could feel even less comfortable working out with someone more fit than them.Couples, workout buddies and fitness partners all want to get in a good workout. Reducing your activity to match your partner’s abilities can lead you to resent working out with them. Alternatively, the less fit partner can feel pushed too hard to keep up and even lead to a preventable overuse injury. Once you begin from a place of honesty, you’re ready to plan your workout!Tip 2: Make the Couples’ Workout Challenging for EveryoneWorkouts need to be challenging to be effective. The trick with couples’ workouts is making the exercise appropriately challenging for each person. Here are some ways fitter partners can make workouts more challenging while respecting their partner’s abilities:Do some intervals during your workout. Return to your partner for the recovery portion of the interval. Short sprints are perfect because you won’t get very far and you need a long time to recover at a very easy pace.Make it harder: The less fit partner can have a bit fun if they go harder/faster while the fitter partner is returning back to them. This will decrease the recovery time the fitter partner has. It also makes the less fit partner an active participant.Similar to the one above, go full speed up hills and return to your partner as they make their way. Focus on technique. Try increasing leg speed turnover if running or cadence if cycling. Try improving your ground contact time balance. Try these drills to improve your running form. You have to go slow to work on technique anyway.Start your workout before or continue working out after your fitness partner stops. This may mean already doing a loop before starting your couples’ workout or doing an extra loop at the end. Do push-up variations or plank variations afterward!If the activity starts or ends from a location that is further from your home, the fitter partner can bike or run to the start or back home after the workout. Plus it can be environmentally friendly!Make active recovery your workout goal. It can be easy to skip recovery days or push too hard when you should be taking it easy. Working out with someone who is less fit than you is a great way to sneak in an active recovery session. Plus, you have the mental rejuvenation of having a fun experience with someone.Tip 3: Be the Lead DogThe fitter partner can carry water, snacks or extra clothes. Push a stroller or pull a bike trailer if kids are along for the journey! This has the effect of making the workout more challenging for one partner. It also gives security for the less fit partner since they know they have easy access to everything they might need.The fitter partner can also take the lead on navigating routes. This takes the mental energy needed to navigate off the less fit partner’s mind. They can just focus on finishing the workout and not unnecessary details.Route selection is also critical to couple workouts.Tip 4: Partner Perfect RoutesChoose a route that both partners find comfortable. A route filled with hills is not the best idea if one partner will be on their limits the whole time. Pick shadier routes if it’s hot.Multiple exit points or loops of a shorter route are great route choices. This is so that if the workout is too much or someone isn’t feeling well, they can easily get back home. This will help take away some of the pressure on the less fit partner. You can also make the route an activity with a goal destination. For example, run to a swimming hole and jump in, then run home. Run to a friend’s house, take a break, then run home. Make the journey the workout and have fun with it!Set your couples’ workout up for success from the start by making it clear that it’s okay to cut the planned route short. The fitter partner can keep going as long as the less fit partner is comfortable finding their way home alone.Tip 5: Set Couples’ Workout Specific GoalsState workout goals clearly before the workout. Work on goals you cannot work on alone. For example, make the focus of the workout mental health, building fortitude or bonding and deepening your relationship. Your brain is a muscle: don’t neglect it. Mental and emotional health is critical to building this muscle.Tip 6: Spice It UpTry new things! Pick an activity that neither of you has done before. New experiences deepen social bonds. You will both automatically be complete beginners! Here are some couples’ workout friendly activities to try next weekend (depending on the season):Standup paddleboardingBouldering or rock climbingTandem bikingMountain bikingRollerblading or rollerskatingParkour Swimming laps (try a new stroke)CanyoningKayakingSkiing, snowboarding or cross country skiingIt doesn’t matter what the activity is so long as both partners want to have a good time and get in a bit of exercise. You could even do an active vacation based on activities neither of you has done before!Tip 7: Embrace DifferencesThis tip may not be for everyone. If one partner is super strong and one is smaller, consider doing something like acrobatics. Dancing—think swing dancing—could also be fun. These types of activities only reveal themselves when partners have very different physical characteristics! Who knows, you might find something you really enjoy and both of you are uniquely good at!Couples’ Workout Exercises and Routinesadidas Training has thousands of workouts you can do as a couple or with a workout or fitness partner! Try these workouts and check out the exercises in the adidas Training App!8-Minute Fit Together Workout [embedded content]Dynamic Duo Partner Workout[embedded content]Max Motivation Partner Workout[embedded content]*** More

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    Create Your Triathlon Training Plan: 3 Steps for Beginner Triathletes

    If you are feeling inspired to try your first triathlon, we can help you get started. Find out what you need to consider to complete a triathlon below. With these three steps you’ll be able to set up your own beginner triathlon training plan.​​Swimming, cycling and running: the challenge of triathlon training is to prepare for three endurance sports at the same time.Good to know:Triathlon distances vary, so you can choose a length that works for you. For your first attempt, try a super sprint triathlon – also known as the “starter triathlon”. Distances are usually approx. 500 meter (0.3 mile) swim, 10K (6.2 miles) bike, and 1.5K (1.6 miles) run. These three sports place very different demands on your body:Swimming is considered to be a technique-heavy endurance sport. Water is 800 times denser than air. To swim efficiently, you need to reduce drag (the resistance of water on your body) while increasing the thrust force of your arms to propel your body forward. The only way to improve this is by working on your swimming technique.In cycling, the bicycle restricts your range of movement. This means that this sport greatly depends on building up a specific kind of endurance and reducing air resistance (drafting and/or aero position).Of the three triathlon sports, running is the one that places the greatest demands on your cardiovascular system. Since this sport is at the end of the race, it is important to increase your running stamina and your mental toughness.You can’t really take a recreational approach to triathlon training or improving at all three sports simultaneously. Therefore, you need to follow certain strategies in order to make performance gains in an efficient manner.3 Steps to Your Triathlon Training Plan Step 1:Determine your training cycle and how much time you want or can devote to your training.Divide the number of weeks before the race by 3.Example: 30 weeks/3 = 10 three-week cyclesNow multiply the average time you want to devote to training per week by 3 to get your overall training volume. Then you need to break your training volume down into the individual weeks of your three-week cycle based on the following weighting: 35% in week 1, 40% in week 2 and 25% in week 3. Therefore, if you want to train 10 hours a week, you will have a 30-hour cycle that breaks down like this:Week 1: 10.5 hours (35 %)Week 2: 12 hours (40 %)Week 3: 7.5 hours (25 %)This is the standard 2:1 training cycle — two weeks of intensive training followed by one week of recovery.Step 2:Choose a training goal for each three-week cycle.What is my best sport?What sport needs the most improvement?Keep in mind: It takes much less effort to maintain a performance level than it does to improve one. Depending on the length of the race, the influence of the individual sports on the overall time differs: swimming makes up about 11-18%, cycling about 50-55% and running about 30-34% of the total time.Thus, improving your swimming performance by 1% doesn’t really have a big impact on your overall time, whereas improving your cycling performance by 1% can shave several minutes off your final time (in long distance races). On the other hand, if you wear yourself out during the swim, you aren’t going to be able to perform well on the bike.Once you have set a goal for a training cycle, the other two sports have to take a back seat. Therefore, if the focus is to work on improving your swimming technique, your cycling and running training sessions will only serve to maintain but not improve your performance level. The priority over the next three weeks will be to improve your swimming efficiency.You can change your goal for each training cycle but make sure to devote more time to your weaknesses than your strengths.Step 3:Keep track of your progress!You should assess your performance at regular intervals (6-8 weeks) — the best time is at the end of the first training week of a cycle. These tests are designed to show you whether or not your training is producing the desired adaptations. But keep in mind that your performance doesn’t always have to increase — your goal can also be to maintain a certain level.Of course, there are also other variations of this approach:Ask yourself the following questions: How much time do I have until my race? What training options do I have? (swimming pool, track, seasons, etc.)Besides the 2:1 training cycle, there is also the 3:1 cycle with three weeks of intensive training and one week of recovery. The weighting for a four-week cycle is 25% in week 1, 27.5% in week 2, 30% in week 3 and 17.5% in week 4.Caution: Because three weeks of intensive training can greatly increase overall fatigue levels, this long training cycle is better suited for experienced athletes.Of course, you can combine the 2:1 and 3:1 cycles to suit your training. Besides these standard training cycles, there are newer approaches like block training, supercompensation training, training at a specific time of day, etc. You should probably talk to a personal trainer, however, before trying one of these approaches because some of them are very demanding and could easily lead to overuse injuries if done improperly.The main thing though is to have fun and stick with your triathlon training plan. We wish you great success in reaching your goals.*** More