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    How Can a Running Warm-Up Help Optimize Performance?

    It’s no secret that a running warm-up[1] is important if it’s a race or the usual weekly run. But many runners don’t know why (or what to watch out for).We’ve compiled a short list of the benefits of running warm-ups, tips on how to warm up properly and go-to running warm-up routines.Find out below how running warm-ups improve your running performance. Check out the go-to warm-up routines at the bottom of the article!1. Running warm-ups raise your body temperatureDynamic warm-up exercises raise your body temperature by heating up your muscles. They also boost your metabolism and accelerate the supply of energy to your muscles.2. Running warm-ups enhance muscle performance [2] As your muscle temperature rises, your muscle viscosity (or resistance) decreases. This results in faster muscle contraction and relaxation, which enhances your performance.3. Running warm-ups boost heart functionYour heart also benefits from warming up. The exercises increase your cardiac output and respiratory minute volume (RMV), thus expanding your VO2 max.4. Running warm-ups improve the load distribution in your jointsContrary to previous belief, new research has shown that even short-term exercise like warming up can help build joint cartilage. The thicker layer of cartilage increases the load-bearing surface and distributes loads more evenly.5. Running warm-ups help prevent injuriesWarming up properly has been proven to minimize the risk of injury. It increases tissue and muscle flexibility and prepares your body to perform fast and explosive movements. Plus, you are less likely to pull or tear a muscle.As an added advantage, warming up improves your mental focus and speeds up your reaction time.Useful Running warm-up tips:Focus on those muscles that will do most of the work.The warm-up effect is short-lived, so keep warming up until the beginning of your race/run. Research has shown that your body temperature remains elevated for only about 10 minutes after you warm up and that after 45 minutes, all traces of your warm-up are gone.It may seem counterintuitive, but if you are warming up for a race, the shorter the race is, the longer your warm-up should be.Never start off with sprints or explosive movements. You should gradually increase the intensity of your warm-up. Your warm-up should never cross your anaerobic threshold.In addition, there are several factors to consider when deciding on how long and how hard to warm up: the distance of the race/run, the time of day, the weather, your age and your physical fitness. Most warm-up routines last somewhere between 10 and 45 minutes (for a race). Unfortunately, there is no one-plan-fits-all approach to warming up. Try the suggested running warm-up routines below and see if they work for you:[embedded content]*** More

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    4 Tips for Running on Vacation • How to Stay Fit and Have fun

    ​​Summer is in full swing and your vacation is just around the corner. For many people, running is an active way to relax and recharge: therefore, many runners can’t imagine not running while on holiday. That being said, here are 4 tips for running on vacation so you can stay fit and enjoy your time off: 1. Mix up your routine with cross-trainingRunners who have a race scheduled after their vacation might want to use the time to take their training up a notch. However, you shouldn’t forget that your break is supposed to provide you with some much-needed recovery time from your normal busy life. Be careful that your running doesn’t add additional stress. You should decide before you leave if you want to do a training camp or focus on rest and relaxation.Of course, it’s a good idea to use running as an active way to relax and relieve daily stress. But on vacation, just try not to focus on distance, pace, and intensity. Take a short break from your training plan and do some cross-training like swimming or cycling. Try some bodyweight training workouts for runners when you wake up in the morning. The change can actually help improve your performance in the long run.Sometimes, less is more:Vacation means rest. Don’t force yourself to work out if your body needs a break.2. Don’t forget about your travel companionsIf you want to run on vacation, you need to balance this with the needs of your significant other, family or friends. There is nothing more annoying for your fellow travelers than constantly having to organize their day around your training plan.Timing: The best times to go running are early in the morning or late in the evening. Plus, it is a good idea to let your loved ones participate in your running experience: have your significant other, children or friends run along with you – together we are stronger!3. Embrace the new opportunitiesRunning on vacation shouldn’t be goal-oriented. Your mind would also benefit from some variety from your usual running routine. Aim to discover new things: marvel at the scenery, discover new routes, and use the time to explore your surroundings. Why not try trail running for a change? This knowledge of the area can come in handy later on day trips and you get to see places off the normal tourist track.Tip:Before setting out, make sure your GPS is functioning and that you have a map of the area downloaded to your phone. That way you don’t have to worry about finding your way back.4. Get used to the new conditionsPay attention to the new conditions of your vacation location and don’t underestimate the effort needed to adjust: differences in climate, time zone, or running surface (sand or rock) can have a big impact on your body. Also, the intensity of the sun should not be underestimated during the summer months. A light wind or a cool breeze might make it difficult to tell the temperature or how much UV radiation your body is being exposed to. Plus, many runners are not accustomed to the extra effort of running in mountain air.Make sure to drink plenty of water throughout the day to avoid dehydration. You should also give your body ample opportunities to recover from the extra stress of the new conditions. Remember, staying fit on vacation is not only about exercise. Rest and relaxation is a big part of staying healthy; a holistic approach will give you better results in the long run.TakeawayThere are lots of benefits to running on vacation: you add to your holiday experience and can work off some of the stress of your normal busy life. Vacation is a perfect time to recharge your batteries and a great opportunity to try a digital detox.These tips for running on vacation should help keep you on track with your fitness, but more importantly – help you prioritize during this well-earned break. Try to free your mind of any thoughts about races and training plans.*** More

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    7 Couples’ Workout Tips to Get Fit with a Partner or Workout Buddy

    Couples’ workouts are a great way to spend time with someone while getting fit. They can also ruin relationships if poorly executed. Couples’ workouts can be particularly challenging if one partner is much fitter than the other. This post will help you make the most of couples’ workouts so that everyone can get in a challenging and fun activity together. Good to know:These tips are also suitable for workout buddies and fitness partners—not just couples!Benefits of Couples’ Workouts, Workout Buddies and Fitness PartnersWorking out with someone else has many benefits:Everyone is more likely to stay accountable to their fitness goals[1].A workout partner who is fitter than you can help you push yourself.Couples’ workouts can boost a couple’s sex life.Working out with a partner can deepen the relationship.Your partner can help you improve your technique.However, couples’ workouts can be tricky to navigate. A fitter partner may feel like their less fit partner will hold them back. They could feel like they’re letting their partner or gym buddy down. The less fit partner may become demoralized.These seven strategies will help you make the most of your couples’ workouts, whether they’re with a special someone, a workout buddy or a fitness partner! Tip 1: Be HonestAcknowledge the difference in fitness. Be respectful and don’t put each other down. Don’t downplay the fitness differential. Instead, call it out respectfully and tie it to the purpose of the workout (more on that below).It can be tempting for the fitter partner to pretend that they aren’t fitter. This is a swift way to annoy your less fit workout partner because you are basically lying to them. They could feel even less comfortable working out with someone more fit than them.Couples, workout buddies and fitness partners all want to get in a good workout. Reducing your activity to match your partner’s abilities can lead you to resent working out with them. Alternatively, the less fit partner can feel pushed too hard to keep up and even lead to a preventable overuse injury. Once you begin from a place of honesty, you’re ready to plan your workout!Tip 2: Make the Couples’ Workout Challenging for EveryoneWorkouts need to be challenging to be effective. The trick with couples’ workouts is making the exercise appropriately challenging for each person. Here are some ways fitter partners can make workouts more challenging while respecting their partner’s abilities:Do some intervals during your workout. Return to your partner for the recovery portion of the interval. Short sprints are perfect because you won’t get very far and you need a long time to recover at a very easy pace.Make it harder: The less fit partner can have a bit fun if they go harder/faster while the fitter partner is returning back to them. This will decrease the recovery time the fitter partner has. It also makes the less fit partner an active participant.Similar to the one above, go full speed up hills and return to your partner as they make their way. Focus on technique. Try increasing leg speed turnover if running or cadence if cycling. Try improving your ground contact time balance. Try these drills to improve your running form. You have to go slow to work on technique anyway.Start your workout before or continue working out after your fitness partner stops. This may mean already doing a loop before starting your couples’ workout or doing an extra loop at the end. Do push-up variations or plank variations afterward!If the activity starts or ends from a location that is further from your home, the fitter partner can bike or run to the start or back home after the workout. Plus it can be environmentally friendly!Make active recovery your workout goal. It can be easy to skip recovery days or push too hard when you should be taking it easy. Working out with someone who is less fit than you is a great way to sneak in an active recovery session. Plus, you have the mental rejuvenation of having a fun experience with someone.Tip 3: Be the Lead DogThe fitter partner can carry water, snacks or extra clothes. Push a stroller or pull a bike trailer if kids are along for the journey! This has the effect of making the workout more challenging for one partner. It also gives security for the less fit partner since they know they have easy access to everything they might need.The fitter partner can also take the lead on navigating routes. This takes the mental energy needed to navigate off the less fit partner’s mind. They can just focus on finishing the workout and not unnecessary details.Route selection is also critical to couple workouts.Tip 4: Partner Perfect RoutesChoose a route that both partners find comfortable. A route filled with hills is not the best idea if one partner will be on their limits the whole time. Pick shadier routes if it’s hot.Multiple exit points or loops of a shorter route are great route choices. This is so that if the workout is too much or someone isn’t feeling well, they can easily get back home. This will help take away some of the pressure on the less fit partner. You can also make the route an activity with a goal destination. For example, run to a swimming hole and jump in, then run home. Run to a friend’s house, take a break, then run home. Make the journey the workout and have fun with it!Set your couples’ workout up for success from the start by making it clear that it’s okay to cut the planned route short. The fitter partner can keep going as long as the less fit partner is comfortable finding their way home alone.Tip 5: Set Couples’ Workout Specific GoalsState workout goals clearly before the workout. Work on goals you cannot work on alone. For example, make the focus of the workout mental health, building fortitude or bonding and deepening your relationship. Your brain is a muscle: don’t neglect it. Mental and emotional health is critical to building this muscle.Tip 6: Spice It UpTry new things! Pick an activity that neither of you has done before. New experiences deepen social bonds. You will both automatically be complete beginners! Here are some couples’ workout friendly activities to try next weekend (depending on the season):Standup paddleboardingBouldering or rock climbingTandem bikingMountain bikingRollerblading or rollerskatingParkour Swimming laps (try a new stroke)CanyoningKayakingSkiing, snowboarding or cross country skiingIt doesn’t matter what the activity is so long as both partners want to have a good time and get in a bit of exercise. You could even do an active vacation based on activities neither of you has done before!Tip 7: Embrace DifferencesThis tip may not be for everyone. If one partner is super strong and one is smaller, consider doing something like acrobatics. Dancing—think swing dancing—could also be fun. These types of activities only reveal themselves when partners have very different physical characteristics! Who knows, you might find something you really enjoy and both of you are uniquely good at!Couples’ Workout Exercises and Routinesadidas Training has thousands of workouts you can do as a couple or with a workout or fitness partner! Try these workouts and check out the exercises in the adidas Training App!8-Minute Fit Together Workout [embedded content]Dynamic Duo Partner Workout[embedded content]Max Motivation Partner Workout[embedded content]*** More

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    Create Your Triathlon Training Plan: 3 Steps for Beginner Triathletes

    If you are feeling inspired to try your first triathlon, we can help you get started. Find out what you need to consider to complete a triathlon below. With these three steps you’ll be able to set up your own beginner triathlon training plan.​​Swimming, cycling and running: the challenge of triathlon training is to prepare for three endurance sports at the same time.Good to know:Triathlon distances vary, so you can choose a length that works for you. For your first attempt, try a super sprint triathlon – also known as the “starter triathlon”. Distances are usually approx. 500 meter (0.3 mile) swim, 10K (6.2 miles) bike, and 1.5K (1.6 miles) run. These three sports place very different demands on your body:Swimming is considered to be a technique-heavy endurance sport. Water is 800 times denser than air. To swim efficiently, you need to reduce drag (the resistance of water on your body) while increasing the thrust force of your arms to propel your body forward. The only way to improve this is by working on your swimming technique.In cycling, the bicycle restricts your range of movement. This means that this sport greatly depends on building up a specific kind of endurance and reducing air resistance (drafting and/or aero position).Of the three triathlon sports, running is the one that places the greatest demands on your cardiovascular system. Since this sport is at the end of the race, it is important to increase your running stamina and your mental toughness.You can’t really take a recreational approach to triathlon training or improving at all three sports simultaneously. Therefore, you need to follow certain strategies in order to make performance gains in an efficient manner.3 Steps to Your Triathlon Training Plan Step 1:Determine your training cycle and how much time you want or can devote to your training.Divide the number of weeks before the race by 3.Example: 30 weeks/3 = 10 three-week cyclesNow multiply the average time you want to devote to training per week by 3 to get your overall training volume. Then you need to break your training volume down into the individual weeks of your three-week cycle based on the following weighting: 35% in week 1, 40% in week 2 and 25% in week 3. Therefore, if you want to train 10 hours a week, you will have a 30-hour cycle that breaks down like this:Week 1: 10.5 hours (35 %)Week 2: 12 hours (40 %)Week 3: 7.5 hours (25 %)This is the standard 2:1 training cycle — two weeks of intensive training followed by one week of recovery.Step 2:Choose a training goal for each three-week cycle.What is my best sport?What sport needs the most improvement?Keep in mind: It takes much less effort to maintain a performance level than it does to improve one. Depending on the length of the race, the influence of the individual sports on the overall time differs: swimming makes up about 11-18%, cycling about 50-55% and running about 30-34% of the total time.Thus, improving your swimming performance by 1% doesn’t really have a big impact on your overall time, whereas improving your cycling performance by 1% can shave several minutes off your final time (in long distance races). On the other hand, if you wear yourself out during the swim, you aren’t going to be able to perform well on the bike.Once you have set a goal for a training cycle, the other two sports have to take a back seat. Therefore, if the focus is to work on improving your swimming technique, your cycling and running training sessions will only serve to maintain but not improve your performance level. The priority over the next three weeks will be to improve your swimming efficiency.You can change your goal for each training cycle but make sure to devote more time to your weaknesses than your strengths.Step 3:Keep track of your progress!You should assess your performance at regular intervals (6-8 weeks) — the best time is at the end of the first training week of a cycle. These tests are designed to show you whether or not your training is producing the desired adaptations. But keep in mind that your performance doesn’t always have to increase — your goal can also be to maintain a certain level.Of course, there are also other variations of this approach:Ask yourself the following questions: How much time do I have until my race? What training options do I have? (swimming pool, track, seasons, etc.)Besides the 2:1 training cycle, there is also the 3:1 cycle with three weeks of intensive training and one week of recovery. The weighting for a four-week cycle is 25% in week 1, 27.5% in week 2, 30% in week 3 and 17.5% in week 4.Caution: Because three weeks of intensive training can greatly increase overall fatigue levels, this long training cycle is better suited for experienced athletes.Of course, you can combine the 2:1 and 3:1 cycles to suit your training. Besides these standard training cycles, there are newer approaches like block training, supercompensation training, training at a specific time of day, etc. You should probably talk to a personal trainer, however, before trying one of these approaches because some of them are very demanding and could easily lead to overuse injuries if done improperly.The main thing though is to have fun and stick with your triathlon training plan. We wish you great success in reaching your goals.*** More

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    Foods to Make you Run Faster? Top Marathon Nutrition Tips

    In a marathon, it’s the right training and preparation that gets you across the finish line. An important part of your training plan is your diet. But there is a lot more to it than just what you eat before and after you run. The right snacks and fluids during the race can help you run faster and boost your performance. You’ll see the best results if you start taking a closer look at your marathon nutrition weeks before the big day.Macronutrients for Runners: A BreakdownIf you’re an endurance athlete, you should get to know and love carbohydrates. They are the most important macronutrient and should make up about 60-65% of your caloric intake. Your muscles rely on carbohydrates for fuel. They are stored as glycogen in your liver for use later on when you need a quick burst of energy. Keeping carbs as a staple in your diet will help you maintain (and improve) your performance and help you achieve that goal time you have your mind set on.(1) Depending on the intensity of your workouts, 6 to 10 g of carbs per kilo of body weight are enough to keep your glycogen stores full. Everyone’s needs are, of course, different. Additionally, carbohydrates help your body recover post workout.2) Additionally, carbohydrates help your body recover post workout. Aim for complex carbohydrates like quinoa, sweet potatoes, whole grains, vegetables and legumes.Protein is the building block of muscle. It’s recommended that you consume 1-1.5 g/kg of your body weight – this is dependent on how intense your workouts are. If you’re doing more strength training, as opposed to running, then you definitely need more of this macronutrient than endurance athletes. Protein is found in both animal products (meat, fish, eggs, milk, and dairy products) as well as plant-based foods (soy and soy products, legumes, nuts, seitan, grain products). You can cover all your protein needs with a vegan diet if you choose. The focus here should be on including a variety of foods in your diet with plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables.Fat is an incredibly important source of energy and vital for your body! First of all, it acts as a protector for your organs, insulates your body (keeps you warm) and is necessary to absorb those critical fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E and K). One gram of fat contains 9 calories of energy. This is twice as much as protein and carbohydrates. How much fat do you need? Around 30-35% of your daily caloric intake should be fats. Where can you find healthy fats? Avocados, salmon, vegetable oils, nuts, and seeds (like flax and chia). These fats provide tons of energy for your marathon training.Preparation is EverythingTraining isn’t the only thing to think about in the final weeks before a marathon. The right marathon nutrition will help you run faster. Get informed about the race set up beforehand: how many aid stations will there be along the course? Don’t try anything new on race day; only consume foods and drinks that you’ve tested during training. Try out different options in the weeks before the marathon.Are you feeling uncertain?A dietician who specializes in sports nutrition can answer any questions you may have and get you on the right track with marathon nutrition.The Final CountdownCarb LoadingSince the race will take longer than 90 minutes, it’s advisable to increase your carb intake in the days leading up to the marathon. The goal of carb loading is to fill up your glycogen stores. However, that does not mean that you should overdo it with carbohydrates. Gradually increase your carbohydrate intake in the week before the marathon to increase the amount of glycogen in your muscles. Do you have digestive problems? Fiber is important for athletes, but make sure to reduce your fiber intake to a minimum just before and on race day.HydrationMake sure you go into the race well hydrated. Start paying attention to your fluid intake 24 hours before the event. Marathon Preparation on Race DayBreakfast 3-4 hours before a run:You want an easy-to-digest breakfast to power you up for your race. Stay away from foods that are high in fat and fiber. These foods will sit in your stomach too long – not a good feeling while running. And, if you want that extra boost, go for a cup of black coffee to get you energized.Breakfast ideas:white toast with jam and a small portion of plain yogurtBircher muesli (soak oats overnight in low-fat cow milk, soy, or oat milk) with bananacereal (not the sugary kind!) with milkporridge with berriesDon’t forget to drink enough water before the marathon.Snack approx. 1 hour before:If you’re used to eating a small snack before your run, go for it! Remember, this is all about how you feel and how you have done it during your training runs.Snack options:bananacereal barTake sips from your water bottle regularly.During your run:There are two very important things to remember during your race: carbs and fluids. Getting the right amount of both is critical.CarbohydratesThe recommended carbohydrate intake for long endurance workouts is 30 to 60 g per hour.(3) That amount increases to 90 g of carbs per hour for races that last longer than 2.5 hours.The following foods are rich in carbohydrates:Banana (approx. 30 g)Energy gel (approx. 25 g)Energy bar (20 to 40 g) Fluid LevelRunners lose a great deal of fluid and electrolytes (especially sodium and potassium) from sweating heavily during long runs. These fluids have to be replaced. The only way to know how much fluid you’ve lost is by weighing yourself before and after your marathon training. Try it to get an idea of how much you should drink on race day.Drink 600 to 1200 ml of fluid per hour of exertion.(4) Your beverage of choice should contain carbs, sodium, and potassium. Isotonic drinks are a great source of energy for your run. Isotonic means it has the same osmotic pressure as blood plasma, so it’s able to be quickly absorbed into the bloodstream. This is the perfect solution for lost fluids and electrolytes during your long run. You can even make your own sports drink at home for your marathon!  Immediately after the MarathonIn order to refill your glycogen stores, some recommendations advise you to consume about 1 to 1.2g of carbohydrates per kg of body weight in the first few hours after you finish the race. However, this is only necessary if you’ve got another race in 8 to 10 hours. That’s probably not the case, right? Don’t worry too much about what you eat after your marathon. Celebrate your achievement; you just finished a marathon and should be proud of yourself. TakeawayYour marathon nutrition should be well-planned. No matter whether it’s before or during your race, it’s important to choose the right drinks and foods to make you run faster and perform your best. *** More

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    3 STRETCHES AND EXERCISES: TREAT AND HEAL SHIN SPLINTS

    You want to get off to a flying start and hit the road full of energy and motivation. But right from the start you feel pain running up the inside of your lower leg. Most of the time, the pain goes away while you are running. But frequently the pain lasts for several days and makes it difficult to keep training. “These symptoms are a sign of medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS), or what is known as shin splints. Nearly a quarter of all interruptions in training can be traced back to this overloading syndrome. The pain usually builds up for weeks and in severe cases, can make running virtually impossible,” explains running expert and coach Sascha Wingenfeld.The following three exercises help prevent shin splintsThese exercises and stretches will help heal shin splints and decrease the likelihood of them happening to you again. 1. Heel-to-toe raise:3×30 repetitions per dayInstructions: Rock back on your heels and pull your toes up. Bend your knees and roll forward up onto the tips of your toes. Focus on a smooth transition from heel to toe.Benefits:Stretching and strengthening the shin muscles will help prevent shin splints from keeping you from exercising.About 2-3 minutes per dayInstructions:Raise your heel and rest your forefoot and toes on the ball in a relaxed position. Try to slowly stretch your joints as you roll the ball of your foot from left to right starting from your big toe.Instructions:Slowly roll the sole of your foot down the ball and increase the pressure on sensitive spots for about 60 seconds.Benefits: Reduces tension in foot muscles to relieve pain from shin splints. Foot rolling for a few minutes every day is an excellent exercise to keep shin splints from reoccurring. Plus, it feels amazing on your feet—bonus!3. Foot and lower leg strengthening:3×30 repetitions per dayInstructions: Wrap a resistance band around your forefoot and push your ankle down as far as you can. Make sure to extend your foot all the way through your big toe and try to get as much power out of your foot muscles as possible.    Benefits:Strong foot and shinbone muscles are less likely to be injured. They will also help you run further and more often without pain in your shins.  5 tips to recover from shin splintsAct quick once you start to feel pain. Ignoring shin splints will make them worse. They can even limit or even stop your running training for months. This kind of overuse injury is often the result of a combination of different factors in your training program and running technique.The following five tips can help you identify the source of the problem and get you running pain-free again:Tip 1: Recovery from shin splints means restPain is a sign that your body needs rest. Short and very easy runs are fine if your shin pain is not severe. The only thing that can help stop severe pain is to take a few days off from running. You must give the affected muscles time to recover since this is an overuse injury.Tip 2: Use your break for something newJust because shin splints have forced you to interrupt your training doesn’t mean you have to stop exercising. Low-impact sports are a great way to not only recover from injury, but come back stronger than ever. Swimming, aqua jogging, cycling or inline skating offer a welcome change of pace. The Runtastic Training app has workouts to help you build muscle in neglected areas too, which is good when you can’t run anyway.Tip 3: Focus on running techniqueShin splints are a sign that you should work on improving your running technique. Maintaining ground contact too long under the full weight of your body can overload your foot and lower leg. Likewise, if your foot lands too far in front of your body (overstriding). These specific running drills can help you avoid shin splints when you are healed enough to get back to exercising.Tip 4: Strengthen your feetShin splints often affect people that lack foot stability. Overpronation (excessive inward roll of your foot after landing) puts tremendous stress on the muscles of your feet. Choose running shoes with the proper support for your foot to compensate for any potential weak spots.Tip 5: Take care of your bodyAfter the pain from shin splints subsides, calf and foot stretching and strengthening exercises can help you stay pain-free. You should perform these before and after your run. These exercises help to warm up the muscles that keep your foot stable when you run. Running barefoot is also an excellent way to improve foot strength, but be careful.Where does the pain come from?Your leg hurts where your calf muscles connect to your shinbone. In technical terms, the pain occurs at the insertion point where the tibialis posterior and soleus muscles attach to the shinbone via the periosteum, or outer surface of the bone. These muscles are responsible for maintaining proper tension in the arch of the foot—essential for running. The muscle cells around your shins can harden if they become irritated and overworked. This causes radiating pain in your lower leg. This is why it so difficult to describe and pinpoint the source of lower leg pain.How to (safely) return to exercise after shin splintsRethink your training (and cut back)Shin splints tend to occur when you rapidly increase running intensity and/or volume. Focus on recovery best practices especially after long runs and hard workouts. Don’t ramp up training too much for too long. Better yet, follow a training plan tailored to you that balances fitness gains with appropriate recovery.Change your routeThe greatest impact on your body comes from running downhill. Without proper form, the foot tends to land too far in front of the knee (overstriding), which puts a lot of strain on your muscles. This is why you should choose a level surface to run on when your shin splints are particularly bad.Start slowly and carefullyReturn to exercise and training only when the pain from shin splints has faded. Follow a professionally structured training plan tailored to your fitness needs and goals. Incorporate stretches for shin splints and strengthen neglected muscles. You only have one body—take care of it, and it will take care of you.*** More

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    COMPLETE GUIDE TO CHOOSING THE BEST RUNNING SHOES FOR YOU

    The best running shoes for you are the ones that keep you healthy and achieving your health and fitness goals. If you run or work out, then you need the right shoes. This guide will help you find your best running shoes based on your unique needs.STEP 1: FIND YOUR FOOT TYPEFoot types fall into low, average and high arches. Find your arch height at home in three easy steps:Place your feet into a shallow pan of water and get the bottom of your feet wet.Step onto a piece of cardboard or something similar with your wet feet.Pull your feet away to reveal your arch shape.Now is an excellent time to take a picture of your footprints before they dry. Compare the image to the descriptions below to find your arch type and which running shoe types may be best for you:Low arch: You have a low arch if you see almost the entire footprint. Your foot may roll inward when you run or walk. You may need a stability or motion-control shoe if the rolling is significant.Normal arch: You have normal arches if you see about half of your footprint. You can probably wear a wide variety of shoes.High arch: You have high arches if you only see the ball of your foot, a thin line on the outside of your foot and your heel. Your feet may roll outward when walking or running. Look for a cushioned shoe with greater flexibility to help absorb shock. Aftermarket insoles inside your shoes can also help support heels and arches. STEP 2: DETERMINE YOUR PRONATION TYPEPronation is a common running term that describes how much the foot rolls inward or outward when it makes contact with the ground. There are three different types of pronation:1. Overpronation occurs when the foot rolls excessively inward. This can lead to muscle strains in your legs and feet. People who overpronate also tend to have low arches. Do your shoes show wear around your big toe and inside sole at the balls of your feet? If so, you may overpronate. Look for stability or motion control shoes to help decrease excessive pronation.2. Underpronation (supination) describes feet that roll outward when running or walking. People who supinate tend to be adults with high arches or “pigeon toes.” Supination is rarer than overpronation. You will know you supinate if your shoes tend to wear along the outside edges. Look for shoes with extra cushioning—more on that below.3. Basic pronation occurs when the foot does not excessively pronate. Look for stability or neutral support shoes. They are more flexible than motion control shoes but still support a healthy stride.STEP 3: DECIDE WHERE YOU RUN MOSTWhich surface you spend most of your time running will determine what shoe category is best for you. Running shoes fall into three broad categories: Treadmill or road running shoes are best if you run on hard, smooth surfaces such as sidewalks, roads or paved trails. Road running shoes have smooth soles since traction is not an issue like it is for trail running. Most people will be happy with this type of shoe.Trail running shoes are best if you spend significant time running on trails. They will protect your feet on uneven surfaces covered in rocks and roots. You will often find waterproof running shoes in this category. Their soles feature traction knobs to help you deal with trail obstacles and uneven surfaces. However, they are not as comfortable for running on paved surfaces due to stiffer soles.Minimalist running shoes and racing flats are lightweight and flexible. They have minimal padding or support. Keep in mind that it takes time for your feet and muscles to adapt to this type of shoe.You should have a general idea of which types of running shoes might be best for you by now. It’s time to consider which specific shoe features are available and suitable for you.FEATURES OF YOUR BEST RUNNING SHOESShopping for running shoes can seem overwhelming. Let’s walk through the basic features of a running shoe to help you further decide which running shoes will be best for you.RUNNING SHOE CUSHIONMost beginner runners wonder if running shoes offer more cushion to make their runs more comfortable. Running shoes are guaranteed to make your run more comfortable and healthy. Running shoe cushion is determined by the foam used in the shoe.More foam may seem to offer more cushion; however, this is not always the case. Foam thickness does affect running shoe cushioning, but the foam’s density also plays an important role. Some people want to feel like they are running on pillows, while others prefer to feel the trail beneath every stride. Running shoe cushioning has a wide range:Shoes with the most cushioning (maximalist) often have thickly padded midsoles. Shoes with this type of cushioning are an excellent choice if you prefer a more plush feeling. Steer clear of this amount of cushioning if you want to feel more connected to your running surface and your running technique.Shoes with less cushioning than maximalist cushion type shoes are known as moderately cushioned. Moderately cushioned shoes sit between maximalist cushioned shoes and minimally cushioned shoes. Shoes in this category will work for most people. They are a great place to start your search for your best running shoes.Minimally cushioned shoes are typically for more advanced runners who want to feel connected to their running surface and have flawless technique. They are lightweight and feel fast, but you will feel the pounding of running more.There is also a category of shoes known as “barefoot.” These shoes attempt to mimic the sensation of running barefoot. You should only try these shoes if you have a particular need or reason, as you can quickly become injured trying these types of running shoes.RUNNING SHOE DROPRunning shoe drop is the difference between cushioning in the shoe’s heel and the shoe’s toe. Running shoe drop affects how your foot encounters the ground. Traditional running shoes have 10mm or more of drop. This is an excellent place to start your search for the best running shoes for you. Lower drop shoes promote landing on the midfoot versus heel striking. Start slow if you are moving to lower drop shoes to reduce the risk of injury.RUNNING SHOE SUPPORT LEVELSRunning shoes offer different levels of support depending on individual needs. Running shoe support differs from running shoe cushioning. Support refers to how the shoe guides your foot through your running gait. There are three support categories:Neutral running shoes are for people whose feet do not roll significantly inward or outward during their running stride.Stability running shoes are a good starting place when buying your next pair of running shoes. They are good running shoes for people who overpronate.Motion control running shoes are for people who significantly overpronate. The stability features closely control your running gait. Motion control shoes can work wonders for people who need them but can be a wrong choice if you only have minor overpronation issues.SUSTAINABILITY AND RUNNING SHOESYou no longer need to choose between high-quality running shoes that will last hundreds of kilometers and environmental sustainability. Decreasing environmental impacts benefits everyone—especially runners. Cleaner air, less garbage and cleaner oceans all make for better running conditions everyone can enjoy.Running shoes can now be made from recycled ocean waste to suit the needs of even the most demanding athlete. Shoes with recycling in mind get a second life instead of ending up in a landfill.When it’s time to replace your old running equipment like running shoes and hoodies, consider sustainable products like the adidas x Stella McCartney Collection. Even the best adidas running shoes now have sustainability in mind.Curious if it’s time to replace your old running shoes? Read through the FAQ to learn what affects how long running shoes should last.Running Shoes FAQ1. DOES THE WEIGHT OF THE RUNNER IMPACT HOW LONG RUNNING SHOES LAST?Yes. Heavier runners put more stress on their shoes than lighter ones. This is because heavier runners exert more force through their shoes. Did you know?When you run, each step can carry the equivalent pressure of up to five times your bodyweight.2. DO RUNNING SHOES DEGRADE OVER TIME?Yes. Running is not the only thing that ages running shoes either. Weather and oxidation also play their part. Cushioning and stability features will weaken even if you do not run in your shoes. Running in shoes that are past their prime can lead to injury and should be replaced.3. DOES RUNNING TECHNIQUE AFFECT HOW LONG RUNNING SHOES LAST?Yes. A runner with a fast running technique puts less stress on running shoes. A runner with a different style may pound the ground with their entire body weight going through their shoes. This force puts a lot of extra strain on the shoes and ages them quicker. Improving your running technique will keep you healthy and save you money in the long run since you won’t need to replace your shoes so often!4. DOES RUNNING SURFACE AFFECT THE LIFESPAN OF MY SHOES?Yes. Hard surfaces like pavement and sidewalk put the most stress on running shoes. Soft trails put less stress on running shoes. However, trails present different hazards (such as sharp rocks and sticks) that can cause other issues for your shoes. Choose a shoe that suits your running surfaces.5. DOES SHOE SIZE AFFECT HOW LONG MY RUNNING SHOES LAST?Maybe. Your foot expands as it makes contact with the ground. The cause of this is the force of your body weight going through your shoe. You run the risk of stretching the seams of your shoe if your shoe is too small. There should be a thumb’s width between the tip of your big toe and the seam of your best running shoes. Your foot needs this much space to roll without hitting the end of your shoe. It’s best to buy shoes in the late afternoon when your feet have already swollen.Proper lacing technique is key to running shoe fit. It stops your foot from sliding around in the slightly too-large shoes and holds your heel in the correct position. Correctly laced running shoes keep your feet from chafing on the seams and prevents unnecessary blisters.6. WHICH RUNNING SHOES LAST THE LONGEST? SHORTEST?The type of running shoe you choose has the most significant influence on the shoe’s lifespan. Choose the shoe that best fits your unique running style. Know the benefits and drawbacks of each shoe type. Lightweight, neutral shoes may only be wearable for a few hundred kilometers or less, but they will feel fast. Sturdy trail running shoes with solid stability features and stiff soles to protect your feet will last far longer. However, they likely won’t feel as nimble as their lighter counterparts like road running shoes or minimalist shoes. Most people will be thrilled with road running shoes with stability features that suit their arch and pronation type. See above about how to find your arch and pronation type to find your best running shoes.7. WHEN TO REPLACE RUNNING SHOES?It depends. Running shoes degrade over time and with use. Continuing to run in shoes that no longer correctly support your feet or running style can lead to injury. Here are some signs it’s time to replace your running shoes:You notice new aches and pains in your feet, ankles, knees or hips. Soreness in these areas may indicate you need to treat yourself to a new pair of running shoes. However, don’t rule out that you may be overdoing your running workouts.The treads on the bottom of your shoes are gone. Immediately replace your shoes, or you could injure yourself.You have run 450 – 800 kilometers in your running shoes. Most running shoes begin to degrade with this amount of use. Use the adidas Running app built-in shoe tracker to know when it’s time to replace your running shoes.*** More

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    Do you get running blisters? Sascha’s got tips for blister prevention

    The worst enemy of every runner: foot blisters. They are one of the most common injuries that occur when running. A blister on your foot can really take the fun out of running, turning every step into sheer agony.How do blisters form?Blisters on the feet are formed by repeated rubbing between the sock, the running shoe and the skin of the foot. The main causes of friction are sharp seams, wrinkled socks or ill-fitting insoles or running shoes. If the skin is irritated (for example, by rubbing) for a long period of time, fluid will collect under the skin, forming a blister. Severe damage to the skin can even lead to blood blisters. These sore spots, depending on their size and intensity, are usually so painful that they make normal running virtually impossible.First aid for Running blistersIf you notice while you are running that a blister is forming on your foot, you should probably end your workout early. This is the only way to keep the blister from getting worse or even infected. Plus, if it hurts to put weight on your foot, this will affect your running style and can potentially lead to painful compensation patterns.If blisters appear during a race or a running event, there is only one thing you can do: grin and bear it! If you can, let a medic tape the sore spots to help reduce the rubbing.After you finish running, the first thing you should do is take a rest and let your foot recover. This gives your skin time to heal and doesn’t make the wound worse.Tip from running expert Sascha:“You can cushion small blisters with special gel bandages. These speed up the healing process and reduce the pressure of the shoe on the painful spot. If the blister is so big that you have to pop it, make sure that the needle is clean and sterile. Otherwise, you run the risk of infection and blood poisoning!”Blister prevention for pain-free runningOf course, the best thing is to prevent blisters before they form. Prepare and take care of your running gear – even little things can cause problems. Use the following three tips to get your running shoes, socks and feet ready for some pain-free running fun:1. Your running shoesThe most important thing is that your running shoes fit properly and are not too small. To keep your toes from rubbing, there should be a thumb’s width of space between your longest toe and the toe box. This ensures that your foot has enough room to move on downhill sections. Also, your feet often swell on long runs. Therefore, you need some extra room so your feet don’t pinch or rub against the side of the shoe.Break in your running shoes and wear them around during the day a few times before you start training in them. This allows your feet to get used to the feel of the new running shoes. You should make sure to run 20-30 km in your running shoes before you use them in a race or a running event. If you track your runs and walks with the adidas Running app, you’ll know exactly when you reach this distance.Change your running shoes regularly. Painful hotspots often depend on the characteristics of the shoe. Changing running shoes frequently allows these sensitive spots to recover faster.If poor workmanship on the inside of your shoe is the cause of the rubbing, it often helps to tape this area or make it more flexible with some Vaseline or baby powder. If this doesn’t work, then you should return the shoe to where you bought it or seek the advice of a shoemaker.The insoles of a new running shoe can also cause blisters. Simply replace these with the insoles from an old pair of running shoes. That’s often enough to solve the problem. However, if your personal, orthopedic insoles do not fit properly, then you should have an expert file and trim them to reduce the friction.2. Your socksYour sock is the interface between your foot and your running shoe. That is why it is especially important to avoid rubbing here and to ensure an equal distribution of pressure. Your socks should fit properly and not be too thick: this keeps them from wrinkling, which can lead to rubbing.Make sure to break in your socks, too: you should never run a race or a running event in new or freshly washed socks. The material is usually too hard and hasn’t had time to adjust to the shape of your foot yet.Keep your feet as dry as possible. Socks made of synthetic fibers wick moisture away from the skin of your feet. Thus, your feet remain dry and it is harder for blisters to form.If you like to run without socks, use special triathlon shoes. These are designed for running without socks and provide more cushioning.3. Your feetYour feet have to work hard when you run. For this reason, you need to take proper care of them. Regular foot care or a pedicure helps keep the skin supple and prevents hot spots from forming.It is probably a good idea to use special gel bandages or tape on problem areas. Make sure there are no wrinkles when you apply them. In addition, you can spread foot repair balm or deer tallow cream on your feet before or after your workout. This cools the stressed skin, keeps it flexible and prevents chafing.You also shouldn’t underestimate the ability of barefoot training to toughen up the skin on your feet. Plus, it is easier on your body, especially your joints, and it strengthens your foot muscles.*** More