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    Answers to Your Most Common Questions About Workout Scheduling

    Workout scheduling is one of the most challenging things about fitness. Elite athletes have coaches and sports scientists telling them exactly how to schedule their workouts. While the rest of us aren’t so lucky, following some simple workout scheduling guidance can go a long way.Here are some answers to your most basic questions about workout scheduling!How Many Days to Workout Each Week? It depends on your fitness level, experience and goals. A very experienced athlete with a high fitness level can easily work out every day of the week and multiple times every day. A beginner athlete should strongly consider taking two or three days per week entirely off or focused on recovery. If you’re not sure how many recovery days per week you need, here are the signs it’s time for a recovery day.New runners are very strongly advised to take at least two days off from running per week. These recovery days are essential for your body to heal from the damage inflicted by running the other days.Strength-focused athletes might only work out three times per week. This is also to allow the body to adapt to the strength training stimulus productively. Realistically, your daily availability is the biggest limiter regarding how many days you can work out. Be realistic about your schedule and commitments. You will set yourself up for success if you commit to an achievable amount of days to work out rather than constantly missing the workouts you planned.When to Work out / Best Times to Work out?Morning workouts are likely best for most people’s schedules. As the day goes on, commitments pile up as energy and motivation decline. If you have no motivation, are tired, and didn’t focus on nutrition throughout the day, you will either have a bad workout or skip the activity altogether.Morning workouts boost your energy throughout the day. It may be hard to get out of bed, but give it a few weeks, and it will (probably) become easier. Morning workouts are also ideal for endurance athletes who do strength training (which is suggested for 40+ age athletes). These athletes are advised to do their strength training in the morning and, if time allows, cardio in the evening. This schedule decreases the chances of cardio workouts interfering with strength training adaptations due to the interference effect, as noted in the European Journal of Applied Physiology.Afternoon workouts or lunch workouts are also an option. Fitting in a quick run during lunch is great to start a running streak. The problem can be adequately fueling your workout and recovery. If you run during lunch, that means you also probably have to get cleaned up and feed yourself. This adds some time that could make it difficult to get in your workout.Evening workouts are very challenging. They can also be very rewarding. Some people may dread “having to work out” at the end of the day. Other people may look forward to working out in the evening because it is a moment they can destress from their day. Working out in the evening is also great because you can get cleaned up, have some nutritious food and then slip into bed for some recovery sleep.Still not sure when the best time to workout for you is? Read more about when the perfect time to run is.So, when should you work out? Whenever works best for your schedule. But you’ll probably have the most success if you work out in the morning.How to Create a Weekly Workout PlanCreating a weekly workout plan doesn’t need to be complicated. Just follow these simple steps:Decide how many days your schedule allows you to work out in a typical week.Decide how long you will work out each day.Decide when you can reasonably and most often fit in those workouts (morning/afternoon/evening).Plan your intensity days first. They should come after a recovery day. A day off or only cardio training should come after intensity days in most cases.Plan at least one to three recovery days per week (Mondays and Fridays are typical for most schedules).If you are focusing on running or other endurance sports, plan your long workouts for either Saturday or Sunday for typical schedules.Here is a sample weekly workout plan for beginner athletes:Days of the weekWorkoutMondayRecovery/light stretching TuesdayIntensity/strength trainingWednesdayRecovery ThursdayMedium duration cardio FridayDay-off. Focus on good nutrition.SaturdayLong workoutSundayMedium duration cardioHere is a sample weekly workout plan for intermediate athletes:Days of the weekWorkoutMondayRecovery/light stretching TuesdayIntensity/strength trainingWednesdayMedium duration cardio Thursday Intensity/strength training FridayDay-off. Focus on good nutrition.SaturdayLong workoutSundayMedium duration cardioCheck out our half-marathon running plan too!Workout Scheduling for CoreYou can read numerous posts on the adidas Runtastic blog about how important core exercises are. Many of those posts also say that you work your core is pretty much everything you do (if you’re doing the movements and exercises correctly). So, do you need to schedule core workouts?Yes. Schedule time to work on your core. It will make your everyday life better, pain-free, and a strong core will probably boost your self-confidence.You can add on a bit of core work after a run, when you have a few minutes during lunch, or on recovery days if you don’t focus specifically on your core during your other workout days.Not sure what to do for your core? Check out the 10 best moves to strengthen your core! Make sure to work your glutes too!Scheduling Workouts to Get Results and Progress as an AthleteYou build fitness by introducing a stimulus your body is not used to, letting your body recover from that stimulus, and then adding a larger dose of stimulus once your body is recovered. This cycle continues until you reach your athletic potential. Your workout schedule will most likely dictate how far you can push your fitness if you are not a professional athlete. You need to continually challenge your body if you have lofty goals of one day running a half-marathon or even a full marathon. Think about how you will introduce more challenging stimuli over the course of your training when making your workout calendar. For example, your most demanding week of workouts should probably come around two weeks before your marathon. Your previous weeks of activities should build up to that level of stimulus.It sounds more complicated than it is. For most athletes, just add a few minutes of working out each week. Eventually, you will max out how much time you can commit to working out before you start missing workouts. Once this happens, increase the intensity of one of your workouts. Once you max out on the intensity of that workout and you still feel like you can handle more, turn up the intensity on that second intensity day of your week.Keep it simple, don’t push too hard too fast, and listen to your body. Workout Schedule for WomenMost workout schedules are made for men by men. There is a general lack of understanding, research and empathy for how workout schedules for women should differ. Many workout schedules for women are simply the same as they are for men but with reduced intensity and training volume. This is insufficient and grounded in the flawed view that women “can’t handle as much” as men. Womens’ workout schedules should take into account biological factors as well as predominant cultural factors. For example, menstrual cycles should factor into workout schedules and event selection. Working out when one is pregnant is different than when one is not pregnant. Moreover, cultural factors influence how a large number of women will need to schedule workouts. Despite more pushes for equality, childcare and domestic responsibilities disproportionately fall on womens’ shoulders. Many womens’ schedules do not look like typical “9-5” jobs. This makes scheduling workouts very difficult.Should it be this way? Absolutely not. But for many people, it is the reality. If this is the case, be flexible, ask for support when you need it, and know that it’s okay to take time for yourself to accomplish your goals too. Workout Scheduling with Training Plan BuilderDid you know that the adidas Running and Training apps have built-in training plan builders for premium members? Whether you are a beginner athlete that wants to lose one or two kilos or an experienced athlete ready to take on your first marathon, there’s a training plan for you.Best of all, the training plan builder customizes your training plan based on your schedule. All you need to do is tell the training plan what days you can work out and for how long on each of those days. The training plan builder creates a training plan that is tailored to your level, goals, and schedule. It’s up to you to put in the work! Check out the latest features in the adidas Running and Training apps!*** More

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    Running with Allergies: 4 Tips to Treat Seasonal Allergies

    By Pouria Taheri,Head of Medical for adidas Runners and RUNBASE BerlinSpring draws us outdoors and may even spark the start of marathon training, but anyone with hay fever or other seasonal allergies has major limitations to deal with. Spring fever? I don’t think so. Early blooming trees, grasses, and pollen make life hard for those who suffer from allergies. “A training schedule that works can become a real challenge for athletes,” says Pouria Taheri, orthopedic specialist and trauma surgeon, sports physician and adidas Runners medical coach. The body resists any personal ambition. “Even in regular daily activities there is no end to the itchy nose, watery eyes, and sneezing. Breathing becomes harder and the general performance level drops; exercising makes it even worse.”  Here are 4 tips on how to work out despite seasonal allergies: 1. Don’t give upThe fun in sports quickly evaporates when allergies prevent you from lacing up your running shoes. Frustration and the exhausting symptoms often make you want to take a break. “It’s understandable, but that’s exactly what I try to avoid as the attending physician. I encourage people to deal with the annoying problem,” says Pouria Taheri. Fortunately there are several approaches to running with allergies. Most people can hardly believe the most important tip: don’t give up! “Often the reason for the complaints is a lack of fresh air and exercise,” explains the sports physician. You have to gradually give your immune system the chance to adapt.2. Strengthen your immune systemDid you know that regular exercise outdoors is almost as effective as allergen immunotherapy? Carefully building up resilience actually stabilizes the immune system. There are a lot of ways to strengthen your immune system, and many of them involve food. Take a look at what you’re eating and see if you can make some healthy changes. 3. Use first aid for acute problemsIn the alternative above, however, a subjective evaluation of your limits is decisive. You should have medical support such as an inhaler within reach so that your drive doesn’t get you into trouble. “Taking allergy medicine like an antihistamine before your workout is advisable to treat constant problems.” Antihistamines prevent the allergies from causing difficulty breathing or serious reactions like shortness of breath. Alternating your workouts between outdoors and indoors is a smart way to gradually strengthen your immune system and create a smooth transition to resilience.4. Allergen immunotherapyYou should seek medical treatment for ongoing afflictions or tough problems that recur over the years. “Many people try to address the problem with allergen immunotherapy, in which regular exposure to allergens teaches your immune system to adapt. However, this requires patience; the therapy usually takes one to two years.”Good to know:This treatment is not right for everyone. Possible interactions with other substances or medications can lead to adverse reactions. It should be noted that medical supervision is critical in this process for recreational athletes as well as competitive athletes with conditions such as reactive airway disease or asthma.TakeawayAt the end of the day, the annoying sneezing and the many little obstacles of seasonal allergies shouldn’t keep you from reaching your goals. The benefits of combining endurance and strength training are immeasurable and can improve your health long term, so that you don’t have to sacrifice quality of life in old age. Perseverance and smart decisions are essential to reach this higher goal. *** More

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    4 Common Causes of Headaches after Workouts

    Piercing pain at your temples, a throbbing ache in your forehead – we’ve all suffered the agony of headaches, and there are plenty of causes. Some of us are more likely to get them during or after exercise. Good to know:Headaches are divided into two types: primary and secondary. Primary headaches are triggered by exertion, tension, or not enough sleep. Secondary headaches, however, are a symptom of another more serious underlying condition like high blood pressure, an infection, substance withdrawal, or a stroke. In this article we’ll identify 4 common causes of headaches after exercise and tell you how to treat them and prevent them. We’ll also tell you whether exercise can trigger migraines.#1: Poor postureBad posture, stress, and poor form when you work out can cause tension, which can lead to headaches. Tension headaches are described as a constant ache that is usually felt on both sides of the head.(1)Headache preventionCheck your form during workouts and your posture throughout the day. Review these tips on proper running form and be aware of the most common mistakes made during bodyweight exercises. Try using heat, massage, or doing exercises to relieve neck pain to relax your muscles if you get a headache after workouts. #2: DehydrationWhether it’s from exercise or just not drinking enough fluids, dehydration is one of the most common causes of headaches. Calculate exactly how much water you should drink each day with our liquid requirement calculator. Headache preventionMake sure you are drinking enough throughout the day. To add variety, you can include special sports drinks that keep you hydrated and provide your body with important micronutrients. #3: Low blood sugarIt’s not just the headaches after exercise; you also feel weak, shaky, dizzy, and sometimes even nauseous? These symptoms indicate low blood sugar and depleted energy stores. Always ensure that your body has enough energy to work out.  Headache preventionIf you notice the symptoms listed above when you’re exercising, you should take a break. You can refill your energy and increase your blood sugar by eating more carbohydrates. There are also a few foods that can trigger headaches and migraines or make them worse – usually in combination with other causes. Avoid these potential headache triggers (2): alcohol (especially wine or beer) chocolatecaffeinaged cheesefoods high inmonosodium glutamateartificial sweetenersand preservatives like nitrates or nitrites #4: Exercise headachesPrimary headaches caused by strenuous physical activity are called exertional or exercise headaches. These are described as throbbing, migraine-like pain across the whole head (bilateral headaches) and last between 5 minutes and 48 hours. (3, 4) An extreme exercise headache can also cause vomiting and vision problems. It’s important to take exercise-induced headaches seriously. Headache preventionExercise headaches often develop if you skip your warm up, your workout is too strenuous, or it’s too hot. These might also occur when you are at high altitudes, like on a tough hike in the mountains. One way to prevent exercise headaches is to reduce the intensity of your workouts. These tips for running in the summer can help you cope with the heat and avoid dehydration. Important:If headaches last for days or if there are more days in a month with headaches than without, you should consult a specialist. A medical professional can check whether you are suffering from primary or secondary headaches, which may be caused by an underlying condition. Can exercise trigger migraines?First of all, research on the connection between migraines and exercise is not yet as extensive as it could be. However, there are studies which show that migraineurs (people who frequently suffer from migraines) can experience exercise-triggered migraines. It is believed that the exertional headaches and tension headaches mentioned above are more likely to lead to a migraine.(5) If you are at risk of migraines, it is even more important that you prevent the 4 causes of headaches after exercise. The good news: studies also show that regular exercise can help prevent migraines or at least reduce the intensity of the pain. This is thanks to the endorphins produced during sports. (6, 7)TakeawayBefore you start working out, make sure you are hydrated and your energy stores are full. Pay attention to your form and good posture while exercising. If you have a bad headache combined with dizziness, nausea, shakiness and/or vomiting, take a break immediately and consult your physician. The same applies for headaches that last several days.*** More

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    Muscle Recovery: 8 Tips for a Faster Recovery after Sports

    What does “muscle recovery” mean? It means that your body can recoup after a race or a training session. After the body recovers, you are once again fit and ready to perform.How much your body develops and how much your performance improves depends on how well and how quickly you can recover. The faster you recover, […] More

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    Tired After Eating? 6 Tips to Boost Your Energy

    You’ve been looking forward to a delicious lunch all morning. Lunchtime comes and you dig into your meal. It tastes so good. But then afterwards you suddenly feel tired and drowsy. What is happening in your body? After a meal, your body really jumps into high gear – it begins with the digestive process: blood […] More

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    Recovery • 6 Ways to Know When to Take a Rest Day

    When we are feeling extra motivated and eager to see results, we may often push ourselves too far with our training. You may see things on social media like #nodaysoff and feel like you have to train every single day intensely to see results. The reality is, everyone is different and in a different stage […] More