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    Low-Impact Workout for People with Bad Knees

    Are you at the beginning of your fitness journey and want to lose weight first to reduce the impact on your knees? Or you have painful knees and high-impact exercise just isn’t in your future…at all?No worries, there are plenty of low-impact exercises you can do that will get your heart rate up, strengthen your muscles and give you a great workout. Working out with bad kneesHigh-impact workouts like plyometrics and running are not for everybody. People with bad knees can find these workouts really challenging and even painful. Recovery techniques like yoga and foam rolling are essential to keep the knee joints feeling good.Bad knees don’t need to stop you from getting active. There are a lot of low-impact workout recommendations for people with bad knees.In fact, the best way to support your joints throughout your life is by building the muscles around them so they can bear more of the load. You don’t need a gym or fancy equipment to maintain leg strength. Always incorporate leg exercises in your routine to protect your joints.  Since a strong core provides the foundation for your fitness journey, we’ve put together 5 low-impact core exercises for bad knees that you can do anytime, anywhere. These exercises require only your own body weight! Outside, at home, in your hotel room…these exercises are perfect for all occasions!5 Core Exercises for Bad KneesHow to:Perform all of these exercises for 1 minute each. At the end of all 5 exercises, rest for 60-90 secondsRepeat for 3-5 roundsAre you ready?1. High Knee Pull DownExercise tip:Try to bring that knee up above the belly button to effectively engage your core. And, really activate that mind-muscle connection and pretend like you are actually pulling something down.Benefits:This exercise strengthens your core muscles. A strong core can improve flexibility and balance while also reducing back pain. Looking for more core exercises? Check out our core workouts in the adidas Training app. 2. Standing Knee-to-ElbowExercise tip:Keep all the weight in your base leg. The lifted leg should only tap on the ground. Really squeeze your obliques (your side abs) as you bring your knee to your elbow to get the most out of this exercise.Benefits:Another great core exercise for bad knees, the Standing Knee to Elbow also works the muscles of your upper legs and hip flexors. If you struggle with lower back pain or having trouble walking or bending at the hip, you might have tight hip flexors. Incorporating hip mobility stretches into your workout can help loosen up your hips.3. Knee Tuck CrunchesExercise tip:Keep your chin off of your chest, shoulders down and away from the ears and keep your back straight.Benefits: People often neglect their lower abs in the quest for a six-pack. Knee-Tuck Crunches work both upper and lower abs in this dynamic exercise, while also getting your heart rate up. Want to see this exercise in action? Find it in the adidas Training app or on adidas Training’s YouTube channel.4. PunchesExercise tip:Keep your knees slightly bent and your core engaged. Focus on something in front of you and concentrate on hitting that point! You can even write down something that’s bothering you on a piece of paper and tape it to the wall. A great way to release some negative energy.Benefits: The Punches exercise improves coordination while adding an aerobic element to the workout. Stabilize your core and improve balance with this upper body exercise.Want to see this exercise in action? Check it out in the adidas Training app or on adidas Training’s YouTube channel.5. Squatting Side StepExercise tip:Stay low in the squat with your chest up and core engaged and just step side to side (as wide as feels comfortable for you). You can also add a resistance band around the ankles for an added challenge.Benefits:With all this core work, don’t forget about building leg muscles. The Squatting Side Step works your quads and glutes along with your core muscles. It’s another effective exercise for better balance and agility.Do you have bad knees and have a favorite low-impact exercise? Share it with us in the comments section below! Happy sweating!*** More

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    Liquid Carbs to Hydrate and Replace Electrolytes

    There are two things to pay close attention to when you power through a tough workout: carbs and liquids. You have probably heard about how carbs provide energy needed to run, swim, bike, hike, lift weights, build strength through bodyweight training, or anything else your heart desires. Additionally, you surely are aware that replenishing your body with water during and after a sweaty workout is key.But why do we need to eat carbs and stay hydrated? And how much and when should we be eating carbs and taking in liquids? Finally, what are some examples that combine carbohydrates and hydrating liquids?Carbohydrates: The Most Important MacronutrientFirst, carbohydrates are one of three basic macronutrients (fat and protein are the other two) that provide us with calories. This macronutrient occurs naturally in the following foods:FruitVegetablesLegumesWhole grain productsRicePotatoesFoods that contain carbohydrates bring a variety of important nutrients to the diet–vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals, antioxidants and dietary fiber, to name a few. Carbohydrates are the main energy source for the body. They’re broken down into sugars to act as the body’s gasoline. Athletes are advised to avoid low-carb diets for weight loss, as cutting carbs can harm performance.How Sugar WorksSugars come in all sorts of “flavors.” The simplest of sugars are called monosaccharides, which literally means “one sugar.” Examples of monosaccharides include glucose, fructose, and galactose. Next comes disaccharides. If you guessed that this means “two sugars,” you’re on the money. The most well-known disaccharide is sucrose, better known as table sugar. Sucrose is made up of equal parts glucose and fructose, which are glued together by chemical bonds. After disaccharides come oligosaccharides (3-10 sugars) and then polysaccharides, which translates to “many sugars.” Our bodies convert most of the carbohydrates we eat into glucose for our muscles to use for readily available energy. In fact, glucose is what fuels our brains. Sometimes, we have more glucose available than our body needs. Excess glucose gets stored as glycogen or fat, both of which can be accessed for future energy use. The more simple the carb is, the easier it is for your body to convert it into a quick source of energy. Depending on your activity level and calorie needs, the U.S. Government’s Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends that 45 to 65% of your daily calories should come from carbohydrates.(1) Choose foods with complex carbohydrates (see list above) over simple carbohydrates. Simple carbohydrates are found in white flour products, sodas, fruit juices, and sweets.Carbohydrates and SportsTo sustain energy levels during a workout or race, we can turn to science for our information. Studies have shown that eating carbohydrates 3-4 hours before exercise increases liver and muscle storage of glycogen and enhances exercise performance.(2) During exercise, aim to take in about 20-35 grams for every hour. This ensures that your blood glucose levels stay stable and that your glycogen stores don’t get tapped out. You exercise for less than an hour?Then water is enough to quench your thirst without additional liquid carbs.The right way to hydrate while exercisingThis brings us to to hydration. Water is necessary for basic cellular function and is why the US Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine recommend drinking between 91 and 125 ounces (2.7-3.7 ml) of water each day.(3) Calculate how much water you need:Water is also critical to consume before, during, and after strenuous exercise. Drink about 17 oz. (500 ml) of water around two hours before working out. If you exercise for longer than 60 minutes, you should rehydrate during your workout as well. Drink about 5 oz (150 ml) every 20 minutes. After a high intensity workout you should replace electrolytes and lost fluid. Everyone is different and it depends on how much you sweat.(4) Why you need to replace electrolytesSupplementing water with electrolytes and simple carbohydrates can boost performance, especially when working out for more than one hour. Electrolytes are charged minerals that provide energy for your muscles. They are critical for your muscles to work properly. The most important electrolytes for exercise are: sodiumcalciumchloridemagnesiumpotassiumIf carbs are gasoline, then electrolytes are the motor oil that makes sure your body runs smoothly.Nutrition gels, energy chews, and sports bars are all great (and portable!) sources of electrolytes and simple carbohydrates. Sport drinks aren’t quite as portable, but they combine the benefits of fuel from simple carbohydrates with the benefits of hydration. This makes them perfect for strenuous exercise over 60 minutes.ConclusionStaying hydrated and replacing electrolytes during exercise isn’t rocket science if you follow a few guidelines. Long, tough workout sessions or runs are what you love? Liquid carbs will give you the energy you need to keep going the distance.*** More

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    Leg Day Workout: 20 Squat Variations You Have to Try

    If you want lean, strong legs, and a firm butt, then squats are for you!What is a squat?A squat is a strength training exercise for your lower body. The bodyweight exercise targets quads, glutes, hamstrings, and even your core gets involved when you squat.Because all these muscle groups come along to the squat party, you burn many more calories than if you were to do isolated exercises targeting each of those muscles. Squatting is much more functional than isolated exercises (i.e. quad extensions or hamstring curls). Whether you’re a runner, biker, or just want a great behind, the simultaneous strengthening of different muscle groups helps to prevent injury and improve performance. Talk about more bang for your buck for your leg day workout!Now, before we get started with these 20 squat variations, watch this video to ensure you are performing the basic bodyweight squat properly and safely: If a leg day workout is your favorite training session of the week, then you’re going to love these squat variations!Good to know:These are all bodyweight squat variations, but feel free to add weights to some of these exercises for an extra challenge.Top 20 Bodyweight Squat Variations These are all bodyweight squat variations, but feel free to add weights to some of these if you want to.1. Squat and WalkBegin with your feet hip-width apart, toes pointing forward. Squat down nice and low into a squat position. Keep your chest up and core engaged. Walk four steps forward and four steps back for one repetition. Try to make these big steps while maintaining a low squat position.2. PliÉ Squat + Heel RaisesBegin with your feet shoulder-width apart, toes pointing outward. Squat down nice and low. Lift your right heel up and down, and then your left heel. Now, push through the heels to come back up to start. Tighten your glutes again at the top and repeat.3. Squat KickbackBegin with your feet hip-width apart, toes pointing forward. Perform a squat and as you come up, kick your right leg back like you’re trying to push close a door behind you. As always, be sure to keep your core engaged for balance and control. Bring the right leg down as you lower back down into a squat position. Repeat using the left leg.4. Frog SquatBegin with your feet shoulder-width apart, toes pointing outward. Squat down nice and low until your fingertips touch the ground while maintaining a flat black. Then reach your arms up overhead and jump up towards the sky. Land with soft knees in a loaded squat position, fingers touching the ground.Note:If your fingertips cannot reach down to the floor without an excessive forward lean, don’t go all the way to the floor. Work within your limits and just reach down as far as you can!5. 3-Way Jump SquatBegin with your feet close together, toes pointing forward, knees not touching. Squat down into a narrow squat position, with your legs closer together than with a standard squat. Then jump up into the air and land with soft knees in a regular squat position. Again, jump up into the air and land with soft knees in a plié squat (feet shoulder-width apart, toes facing outward). Then jump-squat your way back to the regular squat and position yourself into a narrow squat to repeat.6. Burpee Squat HoldStart in a standing position. Place your hands on the ground and jump your feet back into a high plank position on your hands. Make sure not to arch your back when you jump back into a plank. Then, jump your feet forward outside your hands with your toes pointing outward. Stay low in the plié squat position and only lift up your upper body. Place your hands back down on the ground in between your feet and repeat!7. Squat with Side Leg LiftBegin with your feet shoulder-width apart and your toes parallel or slightly outward. Perform a squat and as you come up, lift your left leg up to the side and make sure to squeeze the outer part of your glutes. As you step back, lower yourself into a squat again. Repeat with the right leg. To make it harder, do a side kick instead of a lift!8. Side Step SquatBegin with your feet hip-width apart, toes pointing forward. Squat down until your thighs are almost parallel to the ground. Keep your chest up and your core engaged. Now take a step with the right foot to the side. Make sure to keep your thighs parallel to each other and maintain your squat form. Now step with the left leg towards you so that you’re back in a squat. You can switch sides or do 2-3 steps in one direction and then 2-3 in the other.9. Box SquatThis is a great exercise for learning how to squat properly. If you don’t have a box handy, you can use a chair. Start in a standing position with your feet shoulder-width apart. Push your hips back and lower yourself down until your butt touches the box. Make sure not to sit on the box! Then, push the ground with your heels to lift yourself back up.10. Surrender SquatStart kneeling with both knees on the floor. Cross your hands behind your head. Now step into a kneel with one knee up. Push the heel of the front leg to the ground and bring the other leg up and do a squat. Step down into the first position to repeat.11. Single Leg SquatStart with your feet hip-width apart and your toes pointing forward and your arms in front of you. Bend the knee of one leg and lift it off the ground. Push your hips back and bend the knee of the standing leg to slowly lower yourself down. Make sure to keep your hips leveled. Go down as low as you can while keeping your form and do not let your other foot touch the ground. Now push back up from the standing leg. Repeat on the other side.12. Cossack SquatStart with your feet in a wide stance and your toes pointing outwards to the side. Shift your weight to one side and squat down, going as low as you can without lifting the heel of the squatting leg off the ground. Push the heel of the squatting leg to the ground and get back up to the wide starting position. Repeat on the other side.8 More Squat Variations to Maximize Your Leg Day Workout From Chair Squat to Pop Squat: If you need something even more challenging to feel the burn, try these 8 squat exercises for all levelsHow to Incorporate Squat Variations in Your TrainingNow, let’s talk about how to incorporate these exercises into your next leg day workout:You can choose one or two squat exercises and add them to your current routine.Or, you can choose 10-12 of the above-mentioned squat exercises for a full circuit-style leg day workout.Perform 10-20 repetitions (depending on your fitness level) of each squat variation with little rest in betweenRest at the end of the final exercise for 2-3 minutes and repeat for 3 rounds.Squatting is a great way to build lower body strength. If you are looking to work your whole body, download the adidas Training app. Explore our exercises and training plans, or build your own workout with the Workout Creator!*** More

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    Meet Your Goal with The Best Strength Training for Women

    With so many bodyweight workouts available for women out there, it’s hard to choose. On top of that, every woman is different. So there is no “one workout fits all” solution. Finding a fun way to work on your personal goal is how your fitness story comes to life. Looking for a bodyweight workout to start right away? Stop the scrolling madness and try out these recommendations. Depending on your goal, fitness level, and experience, you can: Start with one of the video bodyweight workouts (that our female users love!) Or…Get a free personalized strength training for women with the Workout Creator. Start with a workout video: 4 unique bodyweight workouts What makes these bodyweight workouts special?  8-20 min long, easy to follow along  Female users around the world love them  Each one has a different focus Depending on your time and goal, pick the one that works best for you. Bodyweight workout #1: Toned Legs and Glutes Duration: 15 minutes Focus: Legs and glutes This workout is perfect to start strengthening your lower body. And if you sit a lot, your glutes need your attention, for sure. For an extra challenge, you can always do the workout twice! If you are looking to add variety to your lower body workouts, check out these 15 bodyweight exercises for legs and glutes. [embedded content]Bodyweight Workout #2: Short Full Body Workout Duration: 8 minutes Focus: Full body exercise combos This workout is just 8 minutes long, but it will work your whole body. If the classic reps and sets workout style is not your thing, you might enjoy exercise combos like this instead. Also, it’s great strength training for women on the go – do what you have time for; if you are not in a hurry, repeat it 2-3 times! Get the free 8-minute full body workout in the adidas Training app. Track your workouts to stay motivated! Bodyweight workout #3: HIIT Dance Workout Duration: 11 minutes Focus: Energize and de-stress Whether it’s the first thing you do to start the day or a home office break to re-energize in the afternoon, a dance-inspired workout will always put a smile on your face. By the way… Did you know that HIIT workouts are a great way to improve fitness in short training sessions? Or that a specific phase of your menstrual cycle might make you feel more ready for high intensity workouts? Get the free Energy HIIT workout in the adidas Training app. Track your workouts to stay motivated!  Check out more bodyweight exercises to make your own home HIIT workout. Bodyweight workout #4: Gentle Yoga Flow Duration: 20 minutes Focus: Stretch and unwind Enjoy a gentle yoga session for any fitness level. If you keep track of your menstrual cycle you will notice there are days when pushing it is just not your thing – especially if you have cramps. That’s when this workout might be exactly what you need. It’s perfect to unwind and spend some time getting centered. [embedded content]Get the free Yoga Flow workout in the adidas Training app. Track the workouts to stay motivated! Get a personalized bodyweight workout: Workout Creator Beginners, both women and men, often wish they could just improve a certain body part.But most often than not, focusing on a certain area of your body does not bring satisfying results. Training all muscle groups throughout the week will make you feel and look better. It will strengthen the targeted areas more effectively. Once you cover the basics, you can always add a little extra focus here and there.The Workout Creator tool from the adidas Training app is your shortcut to a personalized bodyweight workout.With the Workout Creator you can…  Choose workout duration  Pick which muscle groups to target  Edit the workout to suit your preference So easy to start, right?You can find out here how to set up the Workout Creator in the adidas Training app (for free!). Takeaway There is more than one bodyweight workout that will help you reach your personal goal. It may seem confusing, especially if you are just starting out. But the good thing is that there’s no wrong way to start! Just make sure to pay attention to your form. You will find tons of different bodyweight workouts focused on strength training for women in the adidas Training app and on our YouTube channel. Looking for something personalized? Make a custom bodyweight workout in just a few seconds using the Workout Creator tool.  More

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    7 Quick and Effective Shoulder Strengthening Exercises for Strong Shoulders

    by Viktoria Wolffhardt, Slalom Canoeist Shoulder strengthening exercises are key to healthy, strong shoulders. Shoulders are very complex joints that we use daily from washing our hair to opening doors. Shoulder strengthening exercises don’t take much time, are easy to do, and will keep your shoulders healthy throughout your life. Recovering from injuries, warming up before working out, or just in between: you don’t need much time, equipment, or expensive machinery to strengthen your shoulders.Why Shoulder Strengthening Exercises are ImportantThe shoulder provides 360-degrees range of motion. Muscles and ligaments stabilize it. The small contact area of the joint is what allows for such extreme mobility. The rotator cuff tendons stabilize the shoulder joint to keep the joint at the best position for the movement required. The extreme mobility of the shoulder joint also means it is very prone to injury.The rotator cuff loses its elasticity and strength as it ages. A significant number of people will have labral (part of the rotator cuff) damage by the time they are merely 40. Sports that require overhead motions are especially risky to the shoulder. Sports like swimming, basketball, and contact sports pose special risks shoulder joints. Poor posture also contributes to damaged shoulders. If you value doing everyday activities, you really need to do shoulder strengthening exercises!Slalom canoeist Viktoria Wolffhardt explains five seven shoulder strengthening exercises you can do anywhere at any time.7 Shoulder Strengthening Exercises1. Shoulder stability exerciseYou might know this exercise from the adidas Training app, it’s called an Up Down. Start in the low plank position and push off from the floor into the high plank. Make sure that you engage your core and keep your hips as stable as possible. Then return to the low plank position and repeat. Alternate between starting with your left and right arm. Repeat this exercise ten to twelve times per side and do a total of three sets.Need a good warm-up before your next race? Learn how to properly warm up for your race!2. Strengthen your rotator cuffStretch a resistance band between your forearms. Move your left and right shoulder in circles in both directions along the wall. You can do this exercise at different heights to stimulate your muscles more. Repeat the exercise ten to twelve times on each side and do a total of three sets. 3. Arm circles with weightsStand with your feet hip-width apart and hold a light weight (e.g. 1 l water bottle) in your left and right hand. Let your arms hang loosely at your sides and lift the bottles upward making small circles until they are in a horizontal position. Briefly hold this position and then slowly lower your arms again.Repeat this exercise ten to twelve times per side, alternate between forward and backward circles. Do a total of three sets per side.Be careful:“Make sure you don’t arch your lower back. Pull your chin back a bit, so that your back stays straight through the exercises.”4. Water bottle stabilizerFill ¾ of a 1.5 l water bottle with water. Pick up the bottle with your right hand and stretch your arm straight out in front of you. Make sure your hand is at the height of your shoulder and your arm is straight. Now try to hold the bottle steady. Hold this position for 30 to 60 seconds, then switch sides and repeat the exercise. Do three sets per side. What the exercise does:“This develops the small muscle groups in the shoulders to relieve strain on the tendons and joints. It is especially good to do when recovering from shoulder injuries.”5. Internal and external rotation with resistance bandAttach a resistance band to a door handle (or another anchor point) and stand with your side next to it. Take the resistance band in your hand and pull it until it’s tight. Check that your arm is at a 90-degree angle and keep your elbow near to your body. If this is impossible, reduce the tension on the band by standing closer to the door handle. Holding the arm’s position, externally rotate your shoulder so that your hand moves in the direction of the door handle. Then internally rotate the shoulder by pulling the fitness band back towards your body against the band’s resistance.Repeat this exercise ten to twelve times per side and do three sets. Tip:“Your pelvis should be stable and facing forward – there should be no rotation of the upper body or hips.”6. Side Neck StretchDon’t stretch to the point of pain. Go slow, breathe, and relax into the stretch.[embedded content]7. Child’s PoseRelax and breathe into the stretch. Drop your shoulders away from your ears. Press down into the ground to really stretch the joint. Be careful if your shoulders are already unstable as this can place the joint in a compromised orientation that could lead to shoulder dislocation. [embedded content]Have fun working out! About Viktoria Wolffhardt:Viktoria Wolffhardt has been a slalom canoeist for 15 years. The runner-up world champion and two-time winner of the U-23 championship is always looking for new challenges. Her motto is: “Be fast, be good, have fun, and always be yourself!”*** More

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    Vegan Athlete Diet ᐅ All About Protein, Vitamin B12 & Iron

    “You’re vegan? But where do you get your protein?” People who have decided to follow a vegan diet have certainly heard that often enough. Athletes need even more protein than non-athletes, but they also have to keep an eye on the other essential nutrients. If you work out regularly and eat a plant-based diet, you have to really take a close look at what you eat. This is the only way to be certain that your body will get everything it needs to be able to perform at its best and recover quickly. Anyone who is wondering whether veganism and sports are compatible should take a look at vegan athletes like Patrik Baboumian, Venus Williams, and Brandon Brazier. We’ll tell you how to do it right and show you which nutrients are especially important to ensure a balanced vegan athlete’s diet. The following questions will be answered in this article:1. What does “vegan” mean and what are the benefits?Veganism is a special form of the vegetarian diet. Vegans don’t eat any animal products at all, such as meat, fish, eggs, dairy products, or honey.A plant-based diet……is associated with a lot of health benefits, because plant-based foods are very nutrient-dense. They are rich in fiber, folate, vitamin C, and other vitamins. Vegans also consume more unsaturated fatty acids and less saturated fats.(1)Athletes can really benefit from the high density of nutrients, as they need more vitamins and minerals during an intense workout. The abundance of antioxidants prevents oxidative stress and protects the immune system. A vegan athelte’s diet is also high in carbohydrates. This macronutrient is the most important source of energy, especially during workouts.Tip:Studies show that vegans have a lower energy intake than people who eat animal products.(2) More energy is required if the activity level is high. Avocados, nuts, seeds, and oils should be a regular part of the vegan diet. Frequent smaller meals can also be an easy way to boost the energy intake.2. What are the most important nutrients in a vegan athlete’s diet?In order to maximize performance and prevent deficiencies, athletes who follow a plant-based diet should make sure there is variety in their meals. Particular focus should be on these nutrients:A) Macronutrients CarbohydratesAthletes aren’t the only ones who need carbohydrates. A vegan diet is rich in this macronutrient, which means fiber, antioxidant, and phytochemical intake is strong, too. The high level of micronutrients is one of the biggest benefits of plant-based foods. Exercise can produce free radicals and lead to oxidative stress. Vegan sports nutrition can counter that and support recovery after training.(3) The high intake of fiber from whole-grain products, beans, and lentils may cause gastrointestinal problems. In some situations (before a race) it makes sense to substitute these with low-fiber carbs:ricewhite pastawhite breadIf you’re working out, you should eat a snack rich in carbohydrates before and after training to keep your performance strong. It can be helpful to eat some carbs during your workout if it is a long one. Most supplements (e.g. gels) are vegan, so you can take them without any worries. ProteinMany people think that it’s difficult to get enough protein when you follow a vegan diet. However, if you eat a wide variety of foods and increase the energy intake, this is not an issue. Athletes require more of this macronutrient than inactive people.Calculate your protein requirement:Vegan athletes generally eat less protein than athletes who consume animal products.(4) The challenge is focusing on quantity and quality. Plant-based protein sources often lack some essential amino acids, especially BCAAs or branched chain amino acids. Are you concerned about getting enough high quality protein as a vegan athlete? The best route is to eat many different sources of plant-based protein each day: nutsseedsbeanslentilstofuquinoagrainsThis ensures that you meet your daily requirements for protein and essential amino acids. If you can’t get what you need from natural foods (due to long workouts), it pays off to use vegan supplements (from soy, peas, rice, or hemp seeds). Pay attention to the quality of the supplements. The Kölner Liste® has a large database of products.  FatVegans usually consume less fat, saturated fat in particular, than those who eat animal products. This reduces the risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, and cancer.(5) Polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially omega-3 fatty acids, play a critical role in healthy (sports) nutrition. Omega-3 fatty acids are known to prevent inflammation in the muscles and joints.(6) Let’s take a closer look at fatty acids:Omega-6 fatty acids:Plant-based diets provide plenty of omega-6 fatty acids, such as linoleic acid. These can be found in wheat germ oil, thistle oil, and hemp oil.Omega-3 fatty acids:Vegans often lack omega-3 fatty acids in their diet. These include alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), which is found in flax seeds, chia seeds, walnuts, and rapeseed oil.The body produces two other fatty acids from alpha-linolenic acid: eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). However, only a small percentage of alpha-linolenic acid is converted into EPA and DHA. The main sources are cold-water fish, shellfish, and algae. In order to avoid a deficiency, vegans are advised to supplement these fatty acids. This doesn’t have to be fish oil – by now there is a variety of plant-based nutritional supplements produced from algae.It’s important to consider both the quantity and quality when it comes to fat. About 30% of your daily calories should come from fat. High-quality plant-based sources for vegan athletes are vegetable oils, nuts, seeds, and avocados.B) Micronutrients Vitamin B12Since no animal products are consumed in a strict vegan diet, there is a risk of developing a B12 deficiency. Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) is produced from microorganisms in the gut flora of plant-eaters. The micronutrient can only be found in meat and dairy products. A B12 deficiency leads to problems like:fatigueanemiapoor concentrationmuscle weaknessnerve damageVitamin B12 can also be found in fortified plant-based milk or breakfast cereals, but it is not yet clear how much of this is actually absorbed by the body. Vegans have to supplement their diet with B12. At least 6 mcg should be consumed daily.(7)IronAccording to the U.S. Department of Health, men should consume 8 mg of iron per day and women 18 mg. Plant-based foods like grains, legumes, seeds, and green vegetables provide iron, many of them even more than meat. The degree to which our body can absorb iron depends on the form of the iron in the food. Readily available heme iron is found in meat, while plant sources contain only non-heme iron. The rate of absorption of nonheme iron is only about 1 to 15%.(8)The good news:You can enhance the absorption of nonheme iron with your diet. If plant-based sources rich in iron are consumed in combination with vitamin C, the iron is absorbed better.Try the following iron-rich foods: oatmeal with raspberries hummus with bell pepper colorful millet salad with orangesTip:Fermented vegetables and sprouts also increase iron absorption. Be careful with how much coffee and tea you drink – they inhibit iron absorption.Female vegan athletes are especially affected by low iron levels. Iron deficiency anemia is caused by low consumption or poor absorption of iron and leads to symptoms such as fatigue, shortness of breath, and weakened athletic performance. Do you struggle with these symptoms? Consult your doctor; a blood test can give you a clearer picture.ZincZinc is important for cell growth, regeneration, and protein metabolism. That’s why athletes require more in their diet. Zinc has a positive effect on athletic performance.(9) Like iron, plant-based zinc is not absorbed as well as from animal sources. This is why vegans have to pay special attention to getting enough trace elements. The recommended daily intake is between 7 (women) and 10 mg (men). Vegans should consume even more than that.Zinc can be found in oats, beans, nuts, seeds, and nutritional yeast. CalciumCalcium is an essential mineral – in volume it’s even the most important in our body. Almost 100% of the calcium in our body is in our bones and teeth. This micronutrient is also an important factor in blood coagulation.Calcium:…can only do its job in the body if there is sufficient vitamin D available. This vitamin promotes the absorption of calcium from the gut into the blood, regulates the calcium metabolism, and is needed for bone growth. That’s why it’s particularly important for vegan athletes to spend enough time outdoors in fresh air and sunshine. Vitamin D should be supplemented in the wintertime.The recommended daily calcium allowance for adults is 1000 mg. If you do not get enough in your diet long-term, you will experience bone loss, which can result in fractures. What foods should vegan athletes include in their diet to get enough calcium? Plant-based sources are: kidney beansbroccolibok choikalealmondssesamefortified soy milk fortified fruit juice Important: spinach and arugula provide a lot of calcium, but they also contain oxalic acid, which decreases absorption. IodineOne study looked at the dietary intake of vegans in Germany. Researchers found that along with calcium and vitamin B12, there is too little iodine included in the diet (only 40% of the recommended allowance). This trace element is used by the body to produce two thyroid hormones: thyroxine and triiodothyronine. The hormones control many processes in the body, such as growth, bone replacement, brain development, and the metabolism. The German Nutrition Society (DGE) recommends a daily allowance of 200 mcg per day.Seaweed is a good plant source for iodine. The micronutrient can also be found in potatoes, cranberries, and iodized salt.3. What foods are essential in vegan nutrition?A vegan athlete’s diet should be colorful and diverse in order to include all the essential nutrients. Make sure you’re eating regularly and consuming enough calories. We’ve put together a list of the best vegan foods for you below:Nutrients | FoodsProtein: legumes, grains, tofu, quinoa, nuts, seeds, vegetablesOmega 3 fatty acids: flax seeds, chia seeds, hemp seeds, walnuts, seaweedVitamin B12: nutritional yeastIron: legumes, grains, nuts, seeds, green vegetablesZinc: beans, nuts, seeds, oats, nutritional yeastCalcium: kale, broccoli, bok choi, beans, almonds, sesame seeds,fortified plant-based milk and juicesIodine: seaweed, potatoes, white beans, cranberries, iodized salt*** More

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    How to do the 9 Most Common Exercises Right

    The nine most common exercises are Plank, Sit-Up, Bridge, Squat, Push-Up, Triceps Dip, Lunge, Side Lunge, and Donkey Kick. Performing common exercises may seem easy, but many people make easily avoidable mistakes that decrease the exercises’ effectiveness, or worse, lead to injury.Learn how to perform the nine most common exercises the right way by following the images and descriptions below. 9 Most Common Exercises with Correct and Incorrect Examples1. PlankPlank mistake #1One of the most common exercises is the classic Plank. It’s such a common exercise because it’s easy to do and hits the primary muscle groups (especially the core) throughout the body. It’s also an easy exercise to perform incorrectly.Common Plank mistakes include hips pushed up instead of level. This reduces the load on your core; thus, missing most of the benefits of this common exercise. Dropping the hips is another frequent plank mistake. This happens when your core is too weak to sustain the proper position throughout the plank interval. Beware of dropping hips and decrease the time of your planks so that you maintain good form.Check out the examples below to see the right and wrong ways to plank. The right way to plank is to keep your body in as straight a line as possible. Arms form an L shape from your shoulders; hips stay level with your shoulders and heels.Tired of the common plank? You have to try these nine plank variations!Wrong: Hips too highRight: Keep hips in line with shoulders and heelsPlank mistake #2Wrong: Hips too lowRight: Keep hips in line with shoulders and heels2. Sit-upAnother widespread exercise is Sit-Ups. Sit-Ups target the abdominal muscles and promote lower back flexibility and good posture when correctly performed. The most common exercise mistake for Sit-Ups is to round your back by pulling your neck forward. This happens because of underdeveloped core muscles (which is why you do sit-ups in the first place). Your body recruits other muscles to pull your body through the movement to compensate for poor form and underdeveloped muscles. Unfortunately, this negates the focus of sit-ups as an ab focused exercise and can lead to lower back pain and neck strains.Keep your eyes focused forward to maintain a neutral back. Pick an object a meter away on a wall and keep your eyes locked on it as you sit up. This will help you maintain proper form. Think of really engaging your ab and lower back muscles to pull you through the sit-up. If you feel like your upper back and neck contribute to the exercise, slow down and refocus on your form.Sit-up mistake #1Wrong: Pulling on your neckRight: Keep your neck straight, in line with your upper backSit-up mistake #2Wrong: Leading with the chin (poking your chin out)Right: Keep your chin tucked in and your eyes facing straight aheadSit-up mistake #3Wrong: Anchoring your feetRight: Keep your feet stable on the floor3. BridgeBridge is a super common exercise to build glute strength, which is essential for running and building a bigger booty. Glute bridges are great to do as a warm-up before strength training or after long periods of sitting at a desk to wake up your glutes.If this standard exercise isn’t part of your routine, make sure it is now and do it right by following the examples below!Check out this post for 4 Glute Bridge exercises for your next butt workout!Bridge mistake #1Wrong: Overarching your backRight: Start lifting from your hips and go up until your body forms a straight lineBridge mistake #2Wrong: Uneven foot pressureRight: Distribute the pressure evenly. Push from your heels, not the edge of your foot or your toes (unless you aim to activate your calf muscles more).4. SquatSquats are a prevalent exercise because they hit all the major muscle groups in a compound movement. While Squats look easy, they’re very easy to do wrong. Even squatting without weights can lead to injury if performed incorrectly. However – done right – Squats build glute, quad, lower back, and core muscle. They’re fantastic for your posture too!Squat mistake #1Wrong: Knees caving inRight: Keep knees in line with your toes or slightly pushed outSquat mistake #2Wrong: Bending the knees firstRight: Initiate the squat by pushing your hips backCheck out other common Squat mistakes or try these 6 Squat variations.5. Push-upWho hasn’t done or tried Push-Ups? They might be the most common exercise of all time. That’s because push-ups target many of the major upper body muscle groups like shoulders and pectorals. They’re also great for your core. Plus, you can do them anywhere! Push-ups can lead to shoulder, elbow and wrist pain if done wrong. Like the plank, don’t let your hips drop towards the ground. Additionally, focus on squeezing your shoulder blades together during the push-up phase and keep those elbows tucked like a bird, not a frog.Check out ten ways to add some spice to your push-up routine! Push-up mistake #1Wrong: Elbows flaringRight: Keep your elbows slightly tucked in and your shoulder blades together Push-up mistake #2Wrong: Sagging midsectionRight: Keep hips in line with shouldersPush-up mistake #3Wrong: Hands in front of shoulders, elbows in “T-shape”Right: Put your hands directly under your shoulders, elbows in “A-shape”Remember to set up properly for the Push-up. 6. Triceps DipThe Triceps Dip is a less common exercise but still valuable to include in your workout routine. It works the triceps and upper arms. It’s perfect for working on shoulder mobility (but be careful if you have sensitive shoulders)!Think of this exercise as a reverse push-up. The same rules apply to the Triceps Dip as the Push-Up.Dip mistake #1Wrong: Flaring elbowsRight: Try to keep elbows in line with your shoulders and your shoulder blades togetherDip mistake #2Wrong: Back collapsing, shoulders going forwardRight: Keep your chest “open”: shoulders back and your shoulder blades together7. LungeLunges are a common exercise for runners because they target the glutes, hamstrings, and quads. They promote hip mobility and proper running form. Lunges have the potential to cause knee injuries if poorly done. They can lead to injuries like Patellar Tendonitis. Avoid injuring your knees or pulling your hamstrings by ensuring your knee doesn’t go past your toes. Keep your back neutral in a straight line. Don’t jump or bounce off your front foot–bring your trailing leg up to it and come smoothly out of the lunge into a standing position.Learn more about taking care of your knees and overall joint health.Lunge mistake #1Wrong: Front knee too far forwardRight: Try to keep your front knee over your toesLunge mistake #2Wrong: Excessive forward lean in upper body Right: Look straight ahead and try to keep your chest upMaster the basics and you’ll be ready for these 10 Lunge variations!8. Side LungeA less common exercise is the side lunge–but it shouldn’t be! Side lunges are great for ball sports athletes, skiers, trail runners, and overall functional mobility and stability. They help your legs, especially your knees, cope with sideways loading. Think of sudden changes in direction like in football–this is a perfect case for doing side lunges.Since most of us spend most of our time moving forward and backward, the stabilizer muscles that help us cope with lateral loads can become too weak. If those muscles are too weak, sudden lateral movements (like tripping while trail running or catching an edge skiing) can cause severe and instant injury.Ease into lateral lunges as they can leave you pretty sore if you’re not used to them. Of course, follow the examples below to do this common exercise the right way!Side Lunge mistake #1Wrong: Collapsing ankleRight: Keep back foot stable on the floorSide Lunge mistake #2Wrong: Pointing toes of the bent leg sidewaysRight: Point the toes of the bent leg forwardSide Lunge mistake #3Wrong: Pushing the knee too far outRight: Keep your bent knee over your toes9. Donkey KickDonkey kick is another widespread exercise that is like a reverse one-legged bridge. Donkey kicks are terrific for improving hip mobility, quad strength, and of course, building that booty! But be careful because they can also lead to groin injuries if you suffer from tight hip flexors (like sitting at a desk all day).Donkey Kick mistake #1Wrong: Overarching the backRight: Try to keep your lower back in a neutral positionDonkey Kick mistake #2Wrong: Foot turns inward or outwardRight: Keep your foot parallel to your lower leg, even if you move your thigh to the sideImportant:Be patient. Don’t expect to get it right the first time! Look at yourself in the mirror, take a video, practice, and explore the movement. Don’t get discouraged by all these common exercise mistakes. It’s easy to “remember” the right form once you feel how your muscles are more effectively activated.For a balanced home bodyweight workout program check out the 12-week training plan from the adidas Training app. Exercise videos demonstrating proper form are included in all workouts.*** More

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    Dry Land Training for Ski Season

    The colder months are fast approaching, and as the temperature drops, the winter stoke starts to rise. If you want to make the most out of the ski season, there are a few exercises you can start doing now that will help ensure you’re in top shape before the slopes open. Ski and snowboard fitness is built on three pillars; balance and coordination, muscular strength and power, and muscular endurance. Improve all three, and you’ll see a big difference in your abilities on the mountain. Whether you plan on hitting the backcountry or sticking to the groomed runs, start preparing now using these exercises.  How To Train for Skiing When you should start: When is your first ski day? Start incorporating these exercises into your workout routine about eight weeks before you plan to hit the slopes.How often you should workout: It takes about 5 minutes to complete one round of these exercises. Start by integrating three rounds into your workouts three to four times a week. Increase the number of rounds as your abilities improve.Don’t forget about cardio: You’ll need a certain level of cardiovascular endurance to take full advantage of your ski days. Be sure to continue boosting your heart rate with activities like running, biking, etc.Exercises For Ski Season Focus on the exercises in the pillars below to build your ski fitness. Pillar 1: Balance & CoordinationExercise: Marching Wall SitWhat it does: This exercise focuses on helping you transfer weight from one foot to the other while maintaining good postural stability and control—both of which will help you keep your balance when you hit unexpected bumps. Exercise: Single Leg DeadliftWhat it does: This is a dynamic, single-leg exercise that challenges your balance while also strengthening your glutes—a key muscle for building stability. Exercise: Single Leg Front To Back HopWhat it does: This exercise will help you improve your reaction time and coordination.  Do this movement with an emphasis on building up your speed. Limit the amount of time your foot is on the ground to fire up your nervous system. Pillar 2: Muscular Strength & PowerExercise: Skier Jumps What it does: This movement will help you work on two key things—absorbing forces and transitioning quickly into generating force. It mimics a skier’s path down the hill. Exercise: Jump SquatsWhat it does: This is a great leg strength and power exercise that will prepare your body for the impact it will encounter on the mountain.Pillar 3: Muscular Endurance Exercise: Speed SkatersWhat it does: Focus on doing this exercise for longer stretches of time to challenge the muscular endurance in your legs. You’ll need that kind of strength for long days on the slopes! Exercise: Wall SitWhat it does: This exercise will also help you build muscular endurance that you will need to get down longer runs without the need for too many breaks. Remember, Recovery Is KeyTraining adequately for ski season means you’ll kick off your winter ready to take full advantage of the mountain sports you love. Still, make sure you incorporate rest and recovery—both during your training and also during those first few weeks of winter. Skiing demands a lot of your body. Allow yourself to fully recuperate after workouts and weekends on the mountains to prevent an early-season injury from derailing your winter. *** More